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Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II Review

The Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II is Sony’s latest mid-range zoom lens aimed at the enthusiast and professional market. It’s an updated version of the Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM, and both lenses share identical casing and almost identical specifications.

This revised 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II retains the original’s constant f/2.8 maximum aperture and 34cm minimum focussing distance. It also incorporates aspherical glass elements to enhance clarity and contrast, along with Extra-low Dispersion elements for minimised chromatic aberration. The new lens also uses nine aperture blades to create a more rounded aperture for smoother background bokeh blur.

Sony’s upgrades for the Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II are few and subtle. The most obvious addition is weather sealing against dust and moisture ingress, but Sony is also claiming improved image quality with less ghosting and flare, along with 4x faster subject tracking speed from the internal Super Sonic wave AF motor.

These improvements will cost you around £200 more than the original Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM, as the new lens sports a price tag of £1889.

Ease of Use

As professional-grade lenses go, the 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II is exceptionally easy to use, with just two physical controls aside from the zoom and focussing rings. The first is the AF/MF switch, which takes the form of a fairly large rotating dial. You needn’t worry that this is susceptible to accidental movement though, as it’s pretty stiff to operate. Within the dial is a conventional button that locks FOCUS, and that’s it. There are no image stabilisation controls, as Sony’s SteadyShot stabilisation system is built into the camera body.

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens mounted on a Sony A99

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens mounted on a Sony A99

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens mounted on a Sony A99

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens mounted on a Sony A99

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens mounted on a Sony A99

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens alongside the Sony A99

Zooming and manually focussing the 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II is also a cinch as both rings are wide and operate smoothly. The focussing ring does not have hard stops, but there is a FOCUS scale window that displays the 34cm minimum FOCUS distance through to infinity, as well as a the same measurements in feet.

Front of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens

Rear of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens

Side of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens

Side of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens at 70mm

Side of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens

Although the 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II isn’t crammed with features, it’s still not a light lens, weighing in at 974g; 19g heavier than its predecessor. This does however reflect the solid build quality and metal casing, while the lens’ 111mm length and 83mm maximum diameter aren’t particularly large for a full-frame, mid-range zoom lens. But if you do decide to use Sony’s optional LA-EA1 A-mount to E-mount adaptor to attach the lens to an Alpha mirrorless body, the size difference between camera and lens will be noticeable.

Side of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens

Side of the Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens in-hand

The Sony Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II lens in-hand

Focal Range

The 24-70mm focal range gives an angle of view of 84-34 degrees on 35mm full frame sensor and 61-23 degrees on an APS-C camera.

Field of view at 24mm

Field of view at 70mm

Focusing

The lens’ internal Super Sonic wave motor isn’t silent, but it is quiet and unobtrusive. Although there is a dedicated manual focussing setting, instant manual FOCUS override is available when in AF mode: just rotate the focussing ring.

While the front of the lens doesn’t rotate during focussing, it does extend approximately 32mm when set at 70mm. But this shouldn’t pose a major problem when attaching filters to the lens’ 77mm thread.

We found the SSM AF motor to be smooth, fast and accurate. We didn’t encounter any instances of FOCUS hunting and tracking AF was certainly fast, though we didn’t have a first-generation 24-700mm F2.8 ZA SSM available for a direct speed comparison.

Chromatic Aberrations

Sony’s premium optical elements and coatings help ensure that chromatic aberration (purple fringing) is rarely an issue. Shoot a high contrast scene and there may be some slight fringing on the edges of frame, but you’ll need to be viewing at 100% image size to notice it, and even then it’s not particularly distracting.

Light Fall-off

Fall-off is moderately high at 24mm while wide open at f/2.8, but the vignetting has already subsided at f/4 and gone almost entirely at f/8. Apart from a hint of fall-off in the extreme corners of frame at the other marked focal lengths while set to f/2.8, the 24-700mm F2.8 ZA SSM II doesn’t exhibit any significant fall-off.

Light fall-off at 24mm

Light fall-off at 70mm

Distortion

If you’re fond of shooting brick walls, you’ll see that the 24-700mm F2.8 ZA SSM II does produce minor barrel distortion at 24mm and the same degree of pincushion distortion at 70mm. In most real-world scenarios this shouldn’t be noticeable. However, if you do need to correct things in software, finding a dedicated lens profile would be a good idea, as the lens’ slightly uneven distortion won’t straighten absolutely perfectly with regular distortion correction.

Distortion at 24mm

Distortion at 70mm

Macro

Although this lens isn’t really intended for close-up work, a 34cm minimum FOCUS distance does mean you can get fairly close to your subject. It’s also worth noting that this figure refers to the distance between your subject and the camera sensor, whereas you can actually place the front of the lens as close as 16cm away, even when zoomed in to 70mm, resulting in surprisingly detailed close-up shots.

Close-up performance

Bokeh

It isn’t just low light shooting that benefits from the 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II’s large maximum aperture, as this lens also generates very smooth out of FOCUS areas through its use of a nine-bladed diaphragm. This provides smoother bokeh than seven or five-blade designs, however bokeh is a fairly subjective part of a lens’ image quality, so check out these 100% crops to see the 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II’s bokeh quality for yourself.

Sharpness

In order to show you how sharp this lens is, we are providing 100% crops on the following pages.

Sony Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T 16-35mm f/2.8 ZA SSM Review

Sony Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T 16-35mm f/2.8 ZA SSM review

Key Specifications

As far as APS-C cameras are concerned this is more of a wideangle zoom than an ultra-wideangle model but it offers full-frame coverage and in that sense its range is directly comparable with that of a 12-24mm zoom on an APS-C body. It also has a fixed f/2.8 maximum aperture that sets it apart from the crowd.

Although the lens shares the same uniformly cylindrical form as its 11-18mm stable-mate the same drawbacks do not apply to the 16-35mm lens. In particular, the rearward zoom ring falls readily to hand and the manual-focusing ring does not rotate during AF operation. Equally importantly, the manual-focusing ring can be used at any time (except in AF-C mode) and exhibits just the right amount of resistance for quick and reliable use. Automatic focusing is also quick, quiet and reliable.

Although the lens is fairly big and heavy, so might not be best suited to a long hike, these characteristics give it a very solid feel. It has also been nicely thought-out, with a FOCUS-lock button provided on the left side of the lens (seen from behind) just where the user’s left thumb would normally fall.

Technically, the results obtained using this lens on an APS-C (a700) body were very good. As would be expected, bearing in mind that only the centre of the image circle was being examined, there is virtually no chromatic aberration to be seen at any aperture and focal-length setting. Similarly, the MTF figures stay above, or within touching distance of 0.25 cycles-per-pixel from f/2.8 right down to f/16. The only spoiler in this respect was a slight weakness in the middle of the focal-length range.

Sadly, all these good things come at a price and even the keen bargain hunter is likely to have to pay £1,400 or more for this lens. That is not an unreasonable price for an f/2.8 pro-spec zoom but it does put the lens out of reach of some buyers.

Sony Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T 24-70mm F/2.8 ZA SSM [SAL2470Z]

sony, carl, zeiss, vario

This high-speed standard zoom lens covers the most commonly required image angle range of standard focal lengths. The Vario-Sonnar T 2,8/24-70 ZA is particularly well-suited for demanding photographers using both digital and analog full-format cameras. This results in a zoom range from a small wide angle to the moderate angle of a tele lens for digital APS-C cameras. At full aperture, the lens achieves particularly uniform high image quality and illumination over the entire image field. The integrated super sonic wave motor (SSM) allows the Vario-Sonnar T 2,8/24-70 ZA to FOCUS extremely fast and practically without any noise. The sturdy mount, massive front bayonet for the lens shade and the metal filter thread make this lens ideal for anyone that appreciates high-quality mechanical precision coupled with outstanding optical performance. As you surely do.

Manufacturer description #2

Very high quality, wide aperture zoom lens covering wide angle to medium telephoto. Smooth, silent AF operation with high-torque SSM (Super Sonic Wave Motor). 17 lens elements in 13 groups, with two aspherical elements and two ED glass elements. Clear, sharp description, with minimized spherical aberration at telephoto end. T coating on optical surfaces for minimal flare and ghosting.

Professional model

  • Combination of focal length range and speed meets professional demands
  • Super Sonic Wave Motor

Part of the Holy Trinity of lenses

The Holy Trinity of lenses refers to a three-lens set that covers a focal length range from the ultra-wide focal length of 14-16mm all the way long to the telephoto focal length of 200mm. The set typically consists of a 16-35mm ultra-wide angle zoom lens, a 24-70mm standard zoom lens and a 70-200mm telephoto zoom lens and usually represents the best constant-aperture zoom lenses in a manufacturer’s lineup. The set is designed to cover almost every genre of photography, be it landscapes, architecture, portraits, weddings, sports, travel or even wildlife (with teleconverter). However, it is also expensive, large and heavy.

The Holy Trinity of lenses (Sony A, F/2.8, Gen. 1):

Lighter weight Weather sealing Fluorine coating

Genres or subjects of photography (11):

Landscapes Cityscapes Buildings Interiors Portraits Photojournalism Weddings Parties Carnivals Live concerts Travel photography

Recommended slowest shutter speed when shooting static subjects handheld:

1/80 th of a second @ 70mm 1/25 th of a second @ 24mm

Alternatives in the Sony A system

Sorted by focal length and speed, in ascending order

  • Wider focal range
  • Longer reach at the longer end
  • Variable speed across the focal length range
  • Slightly slower @ 24mm
  • Slower @ 105mm
  • Simpler optical design
  • Less diaphragm blades (7 vs 9)
  • Larger closest focusing distance (0.49m vs 0.32m)
  • Smaller magnification (1:5.56 vs 1:2.94)
  • In-camera motor
  • No FOCUS mode selector
  • Much lighter (395g vs 961g)
  • Smaller (69mm vs 110mm)
  • Smaller filter size (62mm vs 77mm)
  • Slightly wider focal range
  • Slightly longer reach at the longer end
  • Narrower field of view at the shorter end
  • Less diaphragm blades (7 vs 9)
  • Slightly larger closest focusing distance (0.38m vs 0.32m)
  • Smaller magnification (1:4.55 vs 1:2.94)
  • Micromotor
  • No manual FOCUS override in autofocus mode
  • Lighter (557g vs 961g)
  • Smaller (94mm vs 110mm)
  • Smaller filter size (67mm vs 77mm)

Lenses with similar focal length range

Sorted by manufacturer name

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

  • Older model (1994)
  • Variable speed across the focal length range
  • Slightly slower @ 24mm
  • Much slower @ 70mm
  • Not optimized for digital cameras
  • Simpler optical design
  • Less diaphragm blades (6 vs 9)
  • Larger closest focusing distance (0.5m vs 0.32m)
  • Smaller magnification (1:6.2 vs 1:2.94)
  • In-camera motor
  • No FOCUS mode selector
  • No manual FOCUS override in autofocus mode
  • Much lighter (265g vs 961g)
  • Smaller (63.5mm vs 110mm)
  • Smaller filter size (55mm vs 77mm)

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

  • Older model (2001)
  • Variable speed across the focal length range
  • Slightly slower @ 24mm
  • Much slower @ 70mm
  • Not optimized for digital cameras
  • Simpler optical design
  • Less diaphragm blades (8 vs 9)
  • Slightly larger closest focusing distance (0.4m vs 0.32m)
  • Smaller magnification (1:4.5 vs 1:2.94)
  • In-camera motor
  • No FOCUS mode selector
  • No manual FOCUS override in autofocus mode
  • Much lighter (280g vs 961g)
  • Smaller (76.4mm vs 110mm)
  • Smaller filter size (62mm vs 77mm)

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

  • Older model (1994)
  • Variable speed across the focal length range
  • Slightly slower @ 24mm
  • Much slower @ 70mm
  • Not optimized for digital cameras
  • Simpler optical design
  • Less diaphragm blades (6 vs 9)
  • Slightly larger closest focusing distance (0.4m vs 0.32m)
  • Smaller magnification (1:4.7 vs 1:2.94)
  • In-camera motor
  • No FOCUS mode selector
  • No manual FOCUS override in autofocus mode
  • Much lighter (270g vs 961g)
  • Smaller (59.6mm vs 110mm)
  • Smaller filter size (62mm vs 77mm)

NOTE: Approximate weight and length were used for comparison purposes.

Table of contents Clickable

Pros and cons

Instruction manual Clickable

Carl Zeiss ZA series lenses (9) Clickable

  • 35mm full frame
  • Sony Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T 16-35/2.8 ZA SSM
  • Sony ZEISS Vario-Sonnar T 16-35/2.8 ZA SSM II
  • Sony Carl Zeiss Distagon T 24/2 ZA SSM
  • Sony Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T 24-70/2.8 ZA SSM
  • Sony ZEISS Vario-Sonnar T 24-70/2.8 ZA SSM II
  • Planar T 50/1.4 ZA SSM
  • Sony Carl Zeiss Planar T 85/1.4 ZA
  • Sony Carl Zeiss Sonnar T 135/1.8 ZA
  • APS-C
  • Sony DT Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T 16-80/3.5-4.5 ZA

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Aspherical elements

Aspherical elements (ASPH, XA, XGM) are used in wide-angle lenses for correction of distortion and in large-aperture lenses for correction of spherical aberration, astigmatism and coma, thus ensuring excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture. The effect of the aspherical element is determined by its position within the optical formula: the more the aspherical element moves away from the aperture stop, the more it influences distortion; close to the aperture stop it can be particularly used to correct spherical aberration. Aspherical element can substitute one or several regular spherical elements to achieve similar or better optical results, which allows to develop more compact and lightweight lenses.

Use of aspherical elements has its downsides: it leads to non-uniform rendering of out-of-FOCUS highlights. This effect usually appears as “onion-like” texture of concentric rings or “wooly-like” texture and is caused by very slight defects in the surface of aspherical element. It is difficult to predict such effect, but usually it occurs when the highlights are small enough and far enough out of FOCUS.

Low dispersion elements

Low dispersion elements (ED, LD, SD, UD etc) minimize chromatic aberrations and ensure excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture. This type of glass exhibits low refractive index, low dispersion, and exceptional partial dispersion characteristics compared to standard optical glass. Two lenses made of low dispersion glass offer almost the same performance as one fluorite lens.

Low dispersion elements

Low dispersion elements (ED, LD, SD, UD etc) minimize chromatic aberrations and ensure excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture. This type of glass exhibits low refractive index, low dispersion, and exceptional partial dispersion characteristics compared to standard optical glass. Two lenses made of low dispersion glass offer almost the same performance as one fluorite lens.

Canon’s Super UD, Nikon’s Super ED, Pentax’ Super ED, Sigma’s FLD (“F” Low Dispersion), Sony‘ Super ED and Tamron’s XLD glasses are the highest level low dispersion glasses available with extremely high light transmission. These optical glasses have a performance equal to fluorite glass.

High-refraction low-dispersion elements

High-refraction low-dispersion elements (HLD) minimize chromatic aberrations and ensure excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture.

High Index, High Dispersion elements

High Index, High Dispersion elements (HID) minimize chromatic aberrations and ensure excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture.

Anomalous partial dispersion elements

Anomalous partial dispersion elements (AD) minimize chromatic aberrations and ensure excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture.

Fluorite elements

Synthetic fluorite elements (FL) minimize chromatic aberrations and ensure excellent sharpness and contrast even at fully open aperture. Compared with optical glass, fluorite lenses have a considerably lower refraction index, low dispersion and extraordinary partial dispersion, and high transmission of infrared and ultraviolet light. They are also significantly lighter than optical glass.

According to Nikon, fluorite easily cracks and is sensitive to temperature changes that can adversely affect focusing by altering the lens’ refractive index. To avoid this, Canon, as the manufacturer most widely using fluorite in its telephoto lenses, never uses fluorite in the front and rear lens elements, and the white coating is applied to the lens barrels to reflect light and prevent the lens from overheating.

Short-wavelength refractive elements

High and specialized-dispersion elements (SR) refract light with wavelengths shorter than that of blue to achieve highly precise chromatic aberration compensation. This technology also results in smaller and lighter lenses.

Blue Spectrum Refractive Optics

Organic Blue Spectrum Refractive Optics material (BR Optics) placed between convex and concave elements made from conventional optical glass provides more efficient correction of longitudinal chromatic aberrations in comparison with conventional technology.

Diffraction elements

Diffraction elements (DO, PF) cancel chromatic aberrations at various wavelengths. This technology results in smaller and lighter lenses in comparison with traditional designs with no compromise in image quality.

High refractive index elements

High refractive index elements (HR, HRI, XR etc) minimize field curvature and spherical aberration. High refractive index element can substitute one or several regular elements to achieve similar or better optical results, which allows to develop more compact and lightweight lenses.

Apodization element

Apodization element (APD) is in fact a radial gradient filter. It practically does not change the characteristics of light beam passing through its central part but absorbs the light at the periphery. It sort of softens the edges of the aperture making the transition from foreground to background zone very smooth and results in very attractive, natural looking and silky smooth bokeh.

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Image stabilizer

A technology used for reducing or even eliminating the effects of camera shake. Gyro sensors inside the lens detect camera shake and pass the data to a microcomputer. Then an image stabilization group of elements controlled by the microcomputer moves inside the lens and compensates camera shake in order to keep the image static on the imaging sensor or film.

The technology allows to increase the shutter speed by several stops and shoot handheld in such lighting conditions and at such focal lengths where without image stabilizer you have to use tripod, decrease the shutter speed and/or increase the ISO setting which can lead to blurry and noisy images.

Original name

Lens name as indicated on the lens barrel (usually on the front ring). With lenses from film era, may vary slightly from batch to batch.

Format

Format refers to the shape and size of film or image sensor.

35mm is the common name of the 36x24mm film format or image sensor format. It has an aspect ratio of 3:2, and a diagonal measurement of approximately 43mm. The name originates with the total width of the 135 film which was the primary medium of the format prior to the invention of the full frame digital SLR. Historically the 35mm format was sometimes called small format to distinguish it from the medium and large formats.

APS-C is an image sensor format approximately equivalent in size to the film negatives of 25.1×16.7mm with an aspect ratio of 3:2.

Medium format is a film format or image sensor format larger than 36x24mm (35mm) but smaller than 4x5in (large format).

Angle of view

Angle of view describes the angular extent of a given scene that is imaged by a camera. It is used interchangeably with the more general term field of view.

As the focal length changes, the angle of view also changes. The shorter the focal length (eg 18mm), the wider the angle of view. Conversely, the longer the focal length (eg 55mm), the smaller the angle of view.

A camera’s angle of view depends not only on the lens, but also on the sensor. Imaging sensors are sometimes smaller than 35mm film frame, and this causes the lens to have a narrower angle of view than with 35mm film, by a certain factor for each sensor (called the crop factor).

This website does not use the angles of view provided by lens manufacturers, but calculates them automatically by the following formula: 114.6 arctan (21.622 / CF FL),

CF – crop-factor of a sensor,FL – focal length of a lens.

Mount

A lens mount is an interface — mechanical and often also electrical — between a camera body and a lens.

A lens mount may be a screw-threaded type, a bayonet-type, or a breech-lock type. Modern camera lens mounts are of the bayonet type, because the bayonet mechanism precisely aligns mechanical and electrical features between lens and body, unlike screw-threaded mounts.

Lens mounts of competing manufacturers (Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Sony etc.) are always incompatible. In addition to the mechanical and electrical interface variations, the flange focal distance can also be different.

The flange focal distance (FFD) is the distance from the mechanical rear end surface of the lens mount to the focal plane.

Lens construction

Lens construction – a specific arrangement of elements and groups that make up the optical design, including type and size of elements, type of used materials etc.

Element. an individual piece of glass which makes up one component of a photographic lens. Photographic lenses are nearly always built up of multiple such elements.

Group – a cemented together pieces of glass which form a single unit or an individual piece of glass. The advantage is that there is no glass-air surfaces between cemented together pieces of glass, which reduces reflections.

Focal length

The focal length is the factor that determines the size of the image reproduced on the focal plane, picture angle which covers the area of the subject to be photographed, depth of field, etc.

Speed

The largest opening or stop at which a lens can be used is referred to as the speed of the lens. The larger the maximum aperture is, the faster the lens is considered to be. Lenses that offer a large maximum aperture are commonly referred to as fast lenses, and lenses with smaller maximum aperture are regarded as slow.

In low-light situations, having a wider maximum aperture means that you can shoot at a faster shutter speed or work at a lower ISO, or both.

Closest focusing distance

The minimum distance from the focal plane (film or sensor) to the subject where the lens is still able to FOCUS.

Closest working distance

The distance from the front edge of the lens to the subject at the maximum magnification.

Magnification ratio

Determines how large the subject will appear in the final image. For example, a magnification ratio of 1:1 means that the image of the subject formed on the film or sensor will be the same size as the subject in real life. For this reason, a 1:1 ratio is often called “life-size”.

Manual FOCUS override in autofocus mode

Allows to perform final focusing manually after the camera has locked the FOCUS automatically. Note that you don’t have to switch camera and/or lens to manual FOCUS mode.

Manual FOCUS override in autofocus mode

Allows to perform final focusing manually after the camera has locked the FOCUS automatically. Note that you don’t have to switch camera and/or lens to manual FOCUS mode.

Electronic manual FOCUS override is performed in the following way: half-press the shutter button, wait until the camera has finished the autofocusing and then FOCUS manually without releasing the shutter button using the focusing ring.

Fixed FOCUS

There is no helicoid in this lens and everything is in FOCUS from the closest focusing distance to infinity.

Internal focusing (IF)

Conventional lenses employ an all-group shifting system, in which all lens elements shift during focusing. The IF system, however, shifts only part of the optics during focusing. The advantages of the IF system are:

  • since a lightweight lens group is moved during focusing, manual focusing operation has an extremely light feel, and quick-response autofocusing is possible;
  • the lens length does not change during focusing, which allows to develop more compact and rugged designs;
  • the focusing ring can be placed in the optimum position for focusing and does not move back and forth during focusing;
  • the closest focusing distance can be made shorter than with conventional focusing methods;
  • since the filter attachment ring does not rotate during focusing, convenient use of polarizing filters is possible;
  • since the front part of the lens does not move during focusing, petal lens hoods with good protection from stray light can be used.

Manual diaphragm

The diaphragm must be stopped down manually by rotating the detent aperture ring.

Preset diaphragm

The lens has two rings, one is for pre-setting, while the other is for normal diaphragm adjustment. The first ring must be set at the desired aperture, the second ring then should be fully opened for focusing, and turned back for stop down to the pre-set value.

Semi-automatic diaphragm

The lens features spring mechanism in the diaphragm, triggered by the shutter release, which stops down the diaphragm to the pre-set value. The spring needs to be reset manually after each exposure to re-open diaphragm to its maximum value.

Automatic diaphragm

The camera automatically closes the diaphragm down during the shutter operation. On completion of the exposure, the diaphragm re-opens to its maximum value.

Fixed diaphragm

The aperture setting is fixed at F/2.8 on this lens, and cannot be adjusted.

Number of blades

As a general rule, the more blades that are used to create the aperture opening in the lens, the rounder the out-of-FOCUS highlights will be.

Some lenses are designed with curved diaphragm blades, so the roundness of the aperture comes not from the number of blades, but from their shape. However, the fewer blades the diaphragm has, the more difficult it is to form a circle, regardless of rounded edges.

At maximum aperture, the opening will be circular regardless of the number of blades.

Weight

Excluding case or pouch, caps and other detachable accessories (lens hood, close-up adapter, tripod adapter etc.).

Maximum diameter x Length

Excluding case or pouch, caps and other detachable accessories (lens hood, close-up adapter, tripod adapter etc.).

For lenses with collapsible design, the length is indicated for the working (retracted) state.

Weather sealing

A rubber material which is inserted in between each externally exposed part (manual FOCUS and zoom rings, buttons, switch panels etc.) to ensure it is properly sealed against dust and moisture.

Lenses that accept front mounted filters typically do not have gaskets behind the filter mount. It is recommended to use a filter for complete weather resistance when desired.

Fluorine coating

Helps keep lenses clean by reducing the possibility of dust and dirt adhering to the lens and by facilitating cleaning should the need arise. Applied to the outer surface of the front and/or rear lens elements over multi-coatings.

Filters

Lens filters are accessories that can protect lenses from dirt and damage, enhance colors, minimize glare and reflections, and add creative effects to images.

Lens hood

A lens hood or lens shade is a device used on the end of a lens to block the sun or other light source in order to prevent glare and lens flare. Flare occurs when stray light strikes the front element of a lens and then bounces around within the lens. This stray light often comes from very bright light sources, such as the sun, bright studio lights, or a bright white background.

The geometry of the lens hood can vary from a plain cylindrical or conical section to a more complex shape, sometimes called a petal, tulip, or flower hood. This allows the lens hood to block stray light with the higher portions of the lens hood, while allowing more light into the corners of the image through the lowered portions of the hood.

Lens hoods are more prominent in long FOCUS lenses because they have a smaller viewing angle than that of wide-angle lenses. For wide angle lenses, the length of the hood cannot be as long as those for telephoto lenses, as a longer hood would enter the wider field of view of the lens.

Lens hoods are often designed to fit onto the matching lens facing either forward, for normal use, or backwards, so that the hood may be stored with the lens without occupying much additional space. In addition, lens hoods can offer some degree of physical protection for the lens due to the hood extending farther than the lens itself.

Teleconverters

Teleconverters increase the effective focal length of lenses. They also usually maintain the closest focusing distance of lenses, thus increasing the magnification significantly. A lens combined with a teleconverter is normally smaller, lighter and cheaper than a “direct” telephoto lens of the same focal length and speed.

Teleconverters are a convenient way of enhancing telephoto capability, but it comes at a cost − reduced maximum aperture. Also, since teleconverters magnify every detail in the image, they logically also magnify residual aberrations of the lens.

Lens caps

Scratched lens surfaces can spoil the definition and contrast of even the finest lenses. Lens covers are the best and most inexpensive protection available against dust, moisture and abrasion. Safeguard lens elements. both front and rear. whenever the lens is not in use.

Rotary zoom

The change of focal length is achieved by turning the zoom ring and the manual focusing. by turning the separate focusing ring.

Push/pull zooming allows for faster change of focal length, however conventional method based on the rotation of the zoom ring provides more accurate and smooth zooming.

Push/pull zoom

The change of focal length happens when the photographer moves the ring towards the mount or backwards.

Push/pull zooming allows for faster change of focal length, however conventional method based on the rotation of the zoom ring provides more accurate and smooth zooming.

Zoom lock

The lens features a zoom lock to keep the zoom ring fixed. This function is convenient for carrying a camera with the lens on a strap because it prevents the lens from extending.

Zoom clutch

To set the manual zoom mode, pull the zoom ring towards the camera side until the words “POWER ZOOM” disappear.

Sony Cyber-shot Digital Camera DSC-RX100

Featuring: 20.2 megapixels, large 1″ Exmor CMOS sensor, F1.8 Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens with control ring, 3.6x zoom, P/A/S/M modes, JPEG and RAW image capture, Full HD 1080/60p video with manual control.

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This product has been discontinued and is no longer in stock. Please scroll down for accessories and other options.

This product has been discontinued and is no longer in stock. Please scroll down for accessories and other options.

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sony, carl, zeiss, vario

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Overview / Product Description

Sony Cyber-shot Digital Camera DSC-RX100

Featuring: 20.2 megapixels, large 1″ Exmor CMOS sensor, F1.8 Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens with control ring, 3.6x zoom, P/A/S/M modes, JPEG and RAW image capture, Full HD 1080/60p video with manual control

Exquisite image quality and high-end handling are available for the first time in a truly compact camera. The Cyber-shot RX100 features a massive 1″ sensor and large-aperture F1.8 lens with integrated control ring for intuitive access to settings. Combined with supreme ISO sensitivity, you’ll enjoy richly-detailed results with remarkably low noise even in challenging lighting conditions. Whether you’re a pro looking for a premium compact camera, or simply want to take your point and shoot photography to the next level, the RX100 offers excellent quality and SLR-like operation in a sophisticated.friendly package you’ll want to take everywhere.

Massive 20.2MP Image SensorCompared to the average point and shoot 1/2.3″ sensor size, the RX100 boasts a large, specially developed 1″ Exmor CMOS sensor to capture more light from your scene and reproduce every stunning detail with greater fidelity. Original dual noise reduction and column A/D conversion further decrease noise to ensure smooth, clear reproductioneven in low-light settings.

Optimal OpticsLegendary Carl Zeiss optics and unrivalled Sony imaging technology come together in the RX100’s high-performance Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens. Despite its compact dimensions, this extraordinary lens offers supremely accurate performance, 3.6x optical zoom and an enormous F1.8 circular aperture for gorgeous defocused backgrounds. An integrated control ring puts easy, intuitive access to camera settings right at your fingertips.

Wide Range ISO SensitivityShoot in nearly any light with natural results thanks to sensitivity that ranges from ISO 125 to 6400. Let the Auto ISO mode automatically determine the most appropriate setting, or manually expand sensitivity for greater control. The bright lens, extra large sensor and precision image processing work together to ensure remarkably low noise in a wide range of lighting conditions.

Complete Creative ControlGet SLR-like handling with a full range of controls for video and still shooting-from Program, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority and Manual (P/A/S/M) modes for more advanced photographers, to an incredibly effective iAuto mode perfect for beginners. On-screen prompts help you refine your skills, build confidence and exercise greater creative control.

RAW Image CaptureSave pictures as compact JPEG files, ultra high-quality RAW files, or both at once. When shooting in RAW format, images are saved prior to de-mosaicing or applying white balance, sharpness and color enhancement for maximum latitude when enhancing images on your PC.

Gorgeous Full HD VideoCreate amazingly clear, extra-smooth movies with Full HD 1080/60p video capture in the AVCHD Ver. 2.0 (progressive) format at a high frame rate of 60 fps. You can even record fast-moving subjects and dark settings with astonishing clarity thanks to the large image sensor and high-performance lens.

Whether you’re a professional photographer in need of a truly able, high-performance compact camera to take on the go, or simply wish to expand the creative horizons of your point and shoot photography, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 camera is for you. With a large 1″ Exmor CMOS sensor and ultra-bright F1.8 Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens with 3.6x zoom, you’ll enjoy tack-sharp images and beautifully defocused backgrounds. An intuitive control ring built into the lens grants easy access to aperture settings and more. With Program, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority and Manual (P/A/S/M) modes, get SLR-like handling for complete creative controlan incredibly effective iAuto mode is perfect for beginners. Shoot in nearly any light with natural results thanks to sensitivity that ranges from ISO 125 to 6400, and save pictures as compact JPEG files, high-resolution RAW files, or both at once.

Massive 20.2MP Exmor 1 CMOS Image Sensor

The massive 20.2MP Exmor 1 CMOS sensor captures ultra-high definition images that take full advantage of the cameras sharp Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar T lens. The sensor enables advanced column A/D processing that reduces noise levels, resulting in astonishing low light images with incredible smooth and clear details.

Capture JPEG files, RAW files, or both

The DSC-RX100 saves pictures as compact JPEG files and/or ultra-high quality RAW files. RAW files save images prior to de-mosaicing, white balance, sharpness and color enhancement. This retains maximum latitude for enhancing the image on your PC.

P/A/S/M modes for video and stills

Enjoy a full range of controls for video and still shooting from the beginner’s iAUTO mode to P/A/S/M: Program, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority and Manual. On-screen prompts help you refine your skills, build your confidence and exercise greater creative control.

Low-light ISO 6400 sensitivity

Incredibly clear low-light pictures without sacrificing detail, made possible by the low-noise Exmor CMOS image sensor and refined BIONZ image processor.

Bright F1.8 Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens with 3.6x zoom

Newly developed large-diameter F1.8 Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens delivers refined background defocusing. bokeh. A premium multi-layered T coating also dramatically reduces ghost and flare caused by light reflection.

Full HD 1080/60p

Record crystal clear movies at the highest resolution available with capabilities for 60p in 1080. This provides stunning, fast motion video with less distortion for playback on your HD TV.2 With dual record of stills and movies, you can shoot both at the same time.

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