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MicroTik RB750GR3 hEX Router Reviewed. Mikrotik hex dual wan

MikroTik RB750Gr3

If the installation fail, you might need to upgrade/downgrade to RouterOS 6.49.2, as reported in forum thread.

Quick guide: 1. Backup your RouterOS key. 2. Change the static IP of the wired interface on your computer to 192.168.1.10 3. Run tinyPXE server. Allow any Windows firewall prompts. 3a. Make sure option 54 is the same IP as the static one just set. If it’s not, connect to the router and power it on normally. Restart tinypxe, then power off the router. You can also disable other interfaces like Wi-Fi, etc. 3b. Uncheck the box in the “Boot File” section and select the initramfs-kernel.bin file for the router. 3c. Click Online. 4. Plug the ethernet cable into port 1 of the router and tftp netboot. 4a. To netboot: hold the RESet button while powering up the router. Keep holding until the first beep, then release it when you see activity in tinypxe. 5. Wait until the USR status led stops flashing. Do not power off the device. 6. Unplug the ethernet cable from port 1 and plug it into port 2. 7. Open a browser and navigate to 192.168.1.1.8. Flash the sysupgrade.bin file.

Depending on the chosen version (snapshot/old stable release/stable release) the firmware might contain LuCI. It’s recommended to install the “Current Release” in the table above. Flashing OpenWrt using LuCI: Read the section Flash OpenWrt (“After successfully using a web browser to connect to the OpenWrt LuCI. ”). Flashing OpenWrt using SSH (Linux) or PuTTy (Windows): Use UCI to flash OpenWrt with sysupgrade command. Read the full manual.

NOTE that before 19.07.0 release the router was non-natively supported in 18.06.1 release. Upgrade from 18.06.1 to 19.07.0 is not supported. See the former wiki page for details.

NOTE2 the RouterBOOT included in RouterOS 6.49.x has a ~7MiB limit for TFTP image size, and will reject too-large images if you attempt to TFTP.boot them. Also, to start a TFTP.boot (NetInst) you don’t need to power-off the router: just set it to try a network boot and to always use the “backup boot”, and reboot.

Debricking

In worst case keep “Reset”-button pressed when powering on the Routerboard to access the recovery-boot-loader via serial console. That way the Routerboard can be re-flashed with a RouterOS-image (NPK-file) using the origin MikroTik-Netinstall-software (BOOTP/ TFTP ).

Specific configuration

Network interfaces

The default OpenWRT configuration Numbers of ports: in UCI (the command switch and config file /etc/config/network ), in LuCI, labels on case:

Port number in UCI Port name in LuCI Label on case PVID (untagged VLAN ) tagged VLANs

The default network configuration is:

Interface Name Description Default configuration

Because RB750Gr don’t have Wi-Fi, you may change configuration to more simple and save the CPU resources: turn off bridge for LAN interface in the LuCI. After “Save Apply” the network configuration will:

Interface Name Description Default configuration

Buttons

→ hardware.button on howto use and configure the hardware button(s). Here, we merely name the buttons, so we can use them in the above Howto.

The MikroTik RB750Gr3 has the following buttons:

Hardware

Info

Architecture

Flash Layout

Layer0

mtd0 RouterBoot 0x000000000000-0x000000040000 256 KiBmtd1 bootloader1 0x000000000000- 0x00000000f000 3,75 KiB
m25p80 spi0.0: w25q128jv (16384 Kbytes)
mtd6 firmware 0x000000040000-0x000001000000 16128 KiB
mtd2 hard_config 0x00000000f000- 0x000000010000 4 KiB mtd3 bootloader2 0x000000010000- 0x00000001f000 3,75 KiB mtd4 soft_config 0x000000020000- 0x000000021000 4 KiB mtd5 BIOS 0x000000030000- 0x000000031000 4KiB mtd7 kernel (minor-fw) 0x000000000000-0x0000001e0000 1920 KiB mtd8 rootfs (minor-fw) 0x0000001e0000-0x000000fc0000 14208 KiB

Opening the case

Case is held together by plastic clips on the bottom of case. To open, using screwdriver push clips in slots outwards, this will release bottom panel.

Serial

→ port.serial general information about the serial port, serial port cable, etc.

Use this line for connecting via screen (assuming a typical USB UART dongle):

screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200,cs8,parenb,-cstopb

JTAG

→ port.jtag general information about the JTAG port, JTAG cable, etc.

How to connect to the JTAG Port of this specific device: Insert photo of PCB with markings for JTAG port

MMC/SDCARD

To get support for the SD card slot install:

opkg install kmod-sdhci-mt7620

To extend the internal 16M memory look at extroot_configuration.

Bootlogs

OpenWrt bootlog

[ 0.000000] Linux version 4.14.91 (anton@0xcaf3d00d) (gcc version 7.4.0 (OpenWrt GCC 7.4.0 r9010-adc8b374e3)) #0 SMP Tue Jan 8 08:17:11 2019 [ 0.000000] SoC Type: MediaTek MT7621 ver:1 eco:3 [ 0.000000] bootconsole [early0] enabled [ 0.000000] CPU0 revision is: 0001992f (MIPS 1004Kc) [ 0.000000] MIPS: machine is MikroTik RouterBOARD 750Gr3 [ 0.000000] Determined physical RAM map: [ 0.000000] memory: 10000000 @ 00000000 (usable) [ 0.000000] Initrd not found or empty. disabling initrd [ 0.000000] VPE topology total 4 [ 0.000000] Primary instruction cache 32kB, VIPT, 4-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 0.000000] Primary data cache 32kB, 4-way, PIPT, no aliases, linesize 32 bytes [ 0.000000] MIPS secondary cache 256kB, 8-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 0.000000] Zone ranges: [ 0.000000] Normal [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000fffffff] [ 0.000000] HighMem empty [ 0.000000] Movable zone start for each node [ 0.000000] Early memory node ranges [ 0.000000] node 0: [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000fffffff] [ 0.000000] Initmem setup node 0 [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000fffffff] [ 0.000000] On node 0 totalpages: 65536 [ 0.000000] free_area_init_node: node 0, pgdat 8057fca0, node_mem_map 81003000 [ 0.000000] Normal zone: 512 pages used for memmap [ 0.000000] Normal zone: 0 pages reserved [ 0.000000] Normal zone: 65536 pages, LIFO batch:15 [ 0.000000] random: get_random_bytes called from start_kernel0x90/0x4a0 with crng_init=0 [ 0.000000] percpu: Embedded 14 pages/cpu @81210000 s26000 r8192 d23152 u57344 [ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: s26000 r8192 d23152 u57344 alloc=144096 [ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: [0] 0 [0] 1 [0] 2 [0] 3 [ 0.000000] Built 1 zonelists, mobility grouping on. Total pages: 65024 [ 0.000000] Kernel command line: console=ttyS0,115200 rootfstype=squashfs,jffs2 [ 0.000000] PID hash table entries: 1024 (order: 0, 4096 bytes) [ 0.000000] Dentry cache hash table entries: 32768 (order: 5, 131072 bytes) [ 0.000000] Inode-cache hash table entries: 16384 (order: 4, 65536 bytes) [ 0.000000] Writing ErrCtl register=000460a1 [ 0.000000] Readback ErrCtl register=000460a1 [ 0.000000] Memory: 253428K/262144K available (4430K kernel code, 229K rwdata, 972K rodata, 244K init, 248K bss, 8716K reserved, 0K cma-reserved, 0K highmem) [ 0.000000] SLUB: HWalign=32, Order=0-3, MinObjects=0, CPUs=4, Nodes=1 [ 0.000000] Hierarchical RCU implementation. [ 0.000000] NR_IRQS: 256 [ 0.000000] CPU Clock: 880MHz [ 0.000000] clocksource: GIC: mask: 0xffffffffffffffff max_cycles: 0xcaf478abb4, max_idle_ns: 440795247997 ns [ 0.000000] clocksource: MIPS: mask: 0xffffffff max_cycles: 0xffffffff, max_idle_ns: 4343773742 ns [ 0.000010] sched_clock: 32 bits at 440MHz, resolution 2ns, wraps every 4880645118ns [ 0.007802] Calibrating delay loop. 586.13 BogoMIPS (lpj=2930688) [ 0.073974] pid_max: default: 32768 minimum: 301 [ 0.078739] Mount-cache hash table entries: 1024 (order: 0, 4096 bytes) [ 0.085248] Mountpoint-cache hash table entries: 1024 (order: 0, 4096 bytes) [ 0.093997] Hierarchical SRCU implementation. [ 0.099131] smp: Bringing up secondary CPUs. [ 8.708275] Primary instruction cache 32kB, VIPT, 4-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 8.708284] Primary data cache 32kB, 4-way, PIPT, no aliases, linesize 32 bytes [ 8.708296] MIPS secondary cache 256kB, 8-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 8.708427] CPU1 revision is: 0001992f (MIPS 1004Kc) [ 0.163868] Synchronize counters for CPU 1: done. [ 7.593934] Primary instruction cache 32kB, VIPT, 4-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 7.593942] Primary data cache 32kB, 4-way, PIPT, no aliases, linesize 32 bytes [ 7.593950] MIPS secondary cache 256kB, 8-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 7.594021] CPU2 revision is: 0001992f (MIPS 1004Kc) [ 0.254915] Synchronize counters for CPU 2: done. [ 7.683226] Primary instruction cache 32kB, VIPT, 4-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 7.683233] Primary data cache 32kB, 4-way, PIPT, no aliases, linesize 32 bytes [ 7.683240] MIPS secondary cache 256kB, 8-way, linesize 32 bytes. [ 7.683317] CPU3 revision is: 0001992f (MIPS 1004Kc) [ 0.340090] Synchronize counters for CPU 3: done. [ 0.369944] smp: Brought up 1 node, 4 CPUs [ 0.377701] clocksource: jiffies: mask: 0xffffffff max_cycles: 0xffffffff, max_idle_ns: 19112604462750000 ns [ 0.387482] futex hash table entries: 1024 (order: 3, 32768 bytes) [ 0.393749] pinctrl core: initialized pinctrl subsystem [ 0.400094] NET: Registered protocol family 16 [ 0.413222] FPU Affinity set after 11720 emulations [ 0.421710] mt7621_gpio 1e000600.gpio: registering 32 gpios [ 0.427471] mt7621_gpio 1e000600.gpio: registering 32 gpios [ 0.433278] mt7621_gpio 1e000600.gpio: registering 32 gpios [ 0.441528] clocksource: Switched to clocksource GIC [ 0.447952] NET: Registered protocol family 2 [ 0.452888] TCP established hash table entries: 2048 (order: 1, 8192 bytes) [ 0.459773] TCP bind hash table entries: 2048 (order: 2, 16384 bytes) [ 0.466187] TCP: Hash tables configured (established 2048 bind 2048) [ 0.472588] UDP hash table entries: 256 (order: 1, 8192 bytes) [ 0.478354] UDP-Lite hash table entries: 256 (order: 1, 8192 bytes) [ 0.484813] NET: Registered protocol family 1 [ 0.489098] PCI: CLS 0 bytes, default 32 [ 0.721479] 4 CPUs re-calibrate udelay(lpj = 2924544) [ 0.727963] Crashlog allocated RAM at address 0x3f00000 [ 0.733536] workingset: timestamp_bits=30 max_order=16 bucket_order=0 [ 0.744835] squashfs: version 4.0 (2009/01/31) Phillip Lougher [ 0.750575] jffs2: version 2.2 (NAND) (SUMMARY) (LZMA) (RTIME) (CMODE_PRIORITY) (c) 2001-2006 Red Hat, Inc. [ 0.762708] random: fast init done [ 0.767347] io scheduler noop registered [ 0.771177] io scheduler deadline registered (default) [ 0.776798] gpio-export gpio_export: 1 gpio(s) exported [ 0.782771] Serial: 8250/16550 driver, 3 ports, IRQ sharing disabled [ 0.790351] console [ttyS0] disabled [ 0.793920] 1e000c00.uartlite: ttyS0 at MMIO 0x1e000c00 (irq = 18, base_baud = 3125000) is a 16550A [ 0.802894] console [ttyS0] enabled [ 0.809755] bootconsole [early0] disabled [ 0.818448] cacheinfo: Unable to detect cache hierarchy for CPU 0 [ 0.825439] MediaTek Nand driver init, version v2.1 Fix AHB virt2phys error [ 0.832889] spi-mt7621 1e000b00.spi: sys_freq: 220000000 [ 0.847821] m25p80 spi0.0: w25q128jv (16384 Kbytes) [ 0.852741] 2 fixed-partitions partitions found on MTD device spi0.0 [ 0.859062] Creating 2 MTD partitions on “spi0.0”: [ 0.863856] 0x000000000000-0x000000040000 : “RouterBoot” [ 0.870203] 5 fixed-partitions partitions found on MTD device RouterBoot [ 0.876900] Creating 5 MTD partitions on “RouterBoot”: [ 0.882046] 0x000000000000-0x00000000f000 : “bootloader1” [ 0.888383] 0x00000000f000-0x000000010000 : “hard_config” [ 0.894755] 0x000000010000-0x00000001f000 : “bootloader2” [ 0.901056] 0x000000020000-0x000000021000 : “soft_config” [ 0.907464] 0x000000030000-0x000000031000 : “BIOS” [ 0.913239] 0x000000040000-0x000001000000 : “firmware” [ 0.920008] 2 minor-fw partitions found on MTD device firmware [ 0.925899] Creating 2 MTD partitions on “firmware”: [ 0.930850] 0x000000000000-0x0000001e0000 : “kernel” [ 0.936753] 0x0000001e0000-0x000000fc0000 : “rootfs” [ 0.942633] mtd: device 8 (rootfs) set to be root filesystem [ 0.948398] 1 squashfs-split partitions found on MTD device rootfs [ 0.954601] 0x000000490000-0x000000fc0000 : “rootfs_data” [ 0.961580] libphy: Fixed MDIO Bus: probed [ 1.033513] libphy: mdio: probed [ 2.436328] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet: loaded mt7530 driver [ 2.443001] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet eth0: mediatek frame engine at 0xbe100000, irq 21 [ 2.453465] NET: Registered protocol family 10 [ 2.459162] Segment Routing with IPv6 [ 2.462933] NET: Registered protocol family 17 [ 2.467408] 8021q: 802.1Q VLAN Support v1.8 [ 2.473427] hctosys: unable to open rtc device (rtc0) [ 2.485290] VFS: Mounted root (squashfs filesystem) readonly on device 31:8. [ 2.492876] Freeing unused kernel memory: 244K [ 2.497312] This architecture does not have kernel memory protection. [ 3.021469] random: crng init done [ 3.218372] init: Console is alive [ 3.222036] init:. watchdog. [ 3.685292] kmodloader: loading kernel modules from /etc/modules-boot.d/ [ 3.742048] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs [ 3.747618] usbcore: registered new interface driver hub [ 3.753092] usbcore: registered new device driver USB [ 3.767341] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: 1e1c0000.xhci supply vbus not found, using dummy regulator [ 3.776008] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: 1e1c0000.xhci supply vusb33 not found, using dummy regulator [ 3.784905] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: xHCI Host Controller [ 3.790220] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1 [ 3.801673] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: hcc params 0x01401198 hci version 0x96 quirks 0x0000000000210010 [ 3.810849] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: irq 20, io mem 0x1e1c0000 [ 3.817533] hub 1-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 3.821344] hub 1-0:1.0: 2 ports detected [ 3.825901] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: xHCI Host Controller [ 3.831210] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 2 [ 3.838719] xhci-mtk 1e1c0000.xhci: Host supports USB 3.0 SuperSpeed [ 3.845332] USB usb2: We don’t know the algorithms for LPM for this host, disabling LPM. [ 3.854259] hub 2-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 3.858076] hub 2-0:1.0: 1 port detected [ 3.864455] kmodloader: done loading kernel modules from /etc/modules-boot.d/ [ 3.881864] init:. preinit. [ 4.080757] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet eth0: port 0 link up [ 4.176635] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet eth0: port 2 link up [ 4.357732] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet eth0: port 1 link up [ 4.658749] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet: PPE started [ 7.902998] jffs2_scan_eraseblock: End of filesystem marker found at 0x10000 [ 7.910237] jffs2_build_filesystem: unlocking the mtd device. [ 7.910266] done. [ 7.918354] jffs2_build_filesystem: erasing all blocks after the end marker. [ 49.108327] done. [ 49.117752] jffs2: notice: (459) jffs2_build_xattr_subsystem: complete building xattr subsystem, 0 of xdatum (0 unchecked, 0 orphan) and 0 of xref (0 dead, 0 orphan) found. [ 49.134648] mount_root: overlay filesystem has not been fully initialized yet [ 49.148399] mount_root: switching to jffs2 overlay [ 49.167632] overlayfs: upper fs does not support tmpfile. [ 49.671015] urandom-seed: Seed file not found (/etc/urandom.seed) [ 49.751467] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet: 0x100 = 0x6060000c, 0x10c = 0x80818 [ 49.766169] procd:. early. [ 49.769145] procd:. watchdog. [ 50.441681] procd:. watchdog. [ 50.445123] procd:. ubus. [ 50.546015] procd:. init. [ 50.781192] kmodloader: loading kernel modules from /etc/modules.d/ [ 50.791443] ip6_tables: (C) 2000-2006 Netfilter Core Team [ 50.805577] input: beeper as /devices/platform/beeper/input/input0 [ 50.815634] ip_tables: (C) 2000-2006 Netfilter Core Team [ 50.827178] nf_conntrack version 0.5.0 (4096 buckets, 16384 max) [ 50.867676] xt_time: kernel timezone is.0000 [ 50.877818] PPP generic driver version 2.4.2 [ 50.883452] NET: Registered protocol family 24 [ 50.890229] kmodloader: done loading kernel modules from /etc/modules.d/ [ 57.572566] mtk_soc_eth 1e100000.ethernet: PPE started [ 57.584500] br-lan: port 1(eth0.1) entered blocking state [ 57.589924] br-lan: port 1(eth0.1) entered disabled state [ 57.596087] device eth0.1 entered promiscuous mode [ 57.600963] device eth0 entered promiscuous mode [ 57.609419] br-lan: port 1(eth0.1) entered blocking state [ 57.614864] br-lan: port 1(eth0.1) entered forwarding state [ 57.620967] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): br-lan: link is not ready [ 58.592272] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_CHANGE): br-lan: link becomes ready

Programming the W25Q128FV flash chip

Pin Header Pinout

Note that in case you want to program the flash chip pin 8 should be tied to GND. This freezes operation of the SoC so that it doesn’t interfere with the programming process. You should also NOT connect VCC to the programmer, instead power the 750gr3 using its normal power supply. This removes the possibility of overloading the USB/Programmer supply.

Although the original author of this section used a Bus Pirate, you can obtain CH341A type USB EEPROM programmer for very little money. There are several advantages to this, one of which being that the programmer has a 16 pin EEPROM socket on board, so you can simply wire the header of the 750gr3 to a DIL socket and plug it in. If you do this, you should wire the pins as follows:

All other pins should remain disconnected. To be safe, you should first plug the DIL into the programmer. this connects pin 8 of the header to GND and prevents the 750 booting up. Then, power on the 750. Then plug the programmer into the USB. It probably doesn’t matter, but this order prevents any signals being applied to the flash chip before the chip itself is powered.

The exact procedure for flashing the image to the W25Q128FV flash chip depends on your flasher. In this example, I used a bus pirate with flashrom. The connections and commands follow this guide: https://www.flashrom.org/Bus_Pirate. Using the bus pirate, reading and writing to the chip can take a very long time!

To make a backup using flashrom and the bus pirate, run the following command multiple times, making sure that each time you get the same image (to be sure you can trust the flasher and chip).

flashrom.p buspirate_spi:dev=/dev/ttyUSB0.r stock_rb750gr3.bin

Finally, to write your constructed image:

flashrom.p buspirate_spi:dev=/dev/ttyUSB0.w final.bin

NOTE If flashrom is taking a long time and you want to make sure it’s still working, use the.VVV argument to enable verbose output.

You should now be able to boot the device and connect to it via SSH like normal after installing OpenWrt/LEDE.

Troubleshooting Make sure the chip is recognized/probed correctly by flashrom. Check all the connections, use a SOIC8 test clamp to connect to the chip (you can find one on ebay or amazon).

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MicroTik RB750GR3 hEX Router Reviewed

Many SmallNetBuilder readers have heard of Ubiquiti small but powerful EdgeRouter Lite, particularly since we’ve reviewed it a few times.

But the ERLite doesn’t have the inexpensive-but-powerful router market to itself. MikroTik was founded in 1996 and is located in Riga, Latvia. In 1997, MikroTik created RouterOS, the software that runs their routers today. You can try RouterOS today and turn a PC into a router if desired. In 2002, MikroTik decided to make their own hardware, creating the RouterBOARD brand.

The RouterBOARD product line includes an extensive list of network products as listed in their 73 page product manual and on their product page. MicroTik products include routers, switches, and wireless devices. In this review, I’m going to explore the MicroTik RB750GR3 hEX router.

The hEX is a 5 port router, enclosed in a white plastic case measuring 4.4″x3.5″x1.1″. On the front you’ll find (5) 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports (1 WAN, 4 LAN) and the power port as shown below.

The LEDs are on the top rear of the router, as shown in the product photo above, which defeats the value of having all ports on one router panel. There is a USB port on the right side of router for connecting a USB drive for copying files to and from RouterOS, or connecting an LTE dongle. The port doesn’t support storage or printer sharing.

Updated 9/26/17

SMB storage sharing is supported using the IP SMB Share menu and I was able to mount a USB drive. But our standard robocopy script threw a file attribute change error and we didn’t pursue further test. USB storage can also be used for web proxy cache, TFTP and FTP storage.

Inside

The main board of the MikroTik hEX, identified with product ID RB750Gr3, is a tiny board, not much bigger than a Raspberry Pi. It’s passively cooled so completely silent. As you can see below, there isn’t much to it.

microtik, rb750gr3, router, reviewed

Mainboard RB750Gr3

Under the main heat sink is an 880MHz MediaTek MT7621A dual-core SoC. The board has 256 MB of RAM and 16 MB of flash memory. A power adapter is included, plus the device can be powered via “passive” Power over Ethernet (PoE) on the router’s WAN port. Buy an RBGPOE adapter if you want to do that.

RouterOS

RouterOS is the operating system for MikroTik routers, based on the Linux v3.3.5 kernel. My hEX came with firmware v6.39.2 which was easily updated to v6.40.3 by simply using the “Auto Upgrade” option in the GUI.

RouterOS supports Graphical User Interface (GUI), Console, and Command Line Interface (CLI) options for applying configurations, as well as a utility called Winbox that I’ll cover next. The list of configuration options presented when connecting to the hEX GUI for the first time illustrates the wide array of capabilities of RouterOS based routers. There are 14 main configuration options along the left side of the hEX GUI titled Interfaces, Bridge, Switch, PPP, Mesh, IP, MPLS, Routing, System, Queues, Files, Log, Radius, and Tools, as shown below.

MikroTik RouterOS

Each of these options has multiple tabs and/or additional sub menus. For example, the IP menu has 24 submenus, as shown below.

RouterOS IP Menu

To state the obvious, the feature set of this router is extensive! MikroTik provides a specification listing here, but the entire list of features would be too long to list. Clearly, this router is not intended as a basic consumer router. There is a simple “Quick Set” option in the GUI where you can set the WAN interface to DHCP and set the router password to quickly and easily get up and running with the default settings. But if your ISP requires another connection type such as PPPoE, L2TP, etc, you’ll need to hit the Wiki and go digging in the IP menus. The sheer number of configuration options indicate this is a router intended for those with networking knowledge. You have been warned!

I found the RouterOS GUI and CLI to be less intuitive than other router configuration interfaces I’ve used. The RouterOS GUI takes a bit of hunting around to find what you’re looking for. The RouterOS CLI is unique and is not similar to either Cisco or Juniper. Thus, from my perspective, there’s a bit of a learning curve to get comfortable with configuring a RouterOS device.

To MikroTik’s credit, their RouterOS Wiki is quite detailed and includes numerous detailed configuration examples. I found myself referring to the Wiki continuously as I tested various features on the hEX. Many of the Wiki’s examples provide the CLI commands for applying configurations. But with all the options in the GUI, it appears you should be able to apply most of the configurations in the GUI.

I found myself using both the GUI and CLI to complete several of my test configurations. An interesting surprise is that configurations applied via the GUI and CLI are automatically saved, no additional step has to be performed to ensure your changes will persist through a power cycle.

Winbox

I wanted to set up remote WAN access to the hEX for testing purposes and the MikroTik Wiki pointed me to using Winbox. Winbox is an interesting utility that allows you to manage the router from a small executable utility you download directly from the router. According to MikroTik, “Winbox is a small utility that allows administration of MikroTik RouterOS using a fast and simple GUI.”

Simply clicking on Winbox in the hEX GUI downloads its .exe file. You don’t install anything; you just run the file. I used Winbox on a Windows PC, but MikroTik says that Winbox can also run on MacOS and Linux using Wine.

I followed the RouterOS Wiki instructions to enable a firewall rule to accept remote Winbox access to the router. Once complete, I was able to access the router remotely. The Winbox utility looks and feels just like the GUI. A screenshot of Winbox remotely connected to the hEX is shown below.

microtik, rb750gr3, router, reviewed

Winbox Utility

Winbox turns out to be a pretty useful RouterOS management utility. From Winbox, not only is remote access simplified, you can launch a terminal for CLI access and even access the full RouterOS manual which presents the same content as the Wiki, mentioned earlier.

Winbox will use TLS encryption to secure its connection, but only if you change to Advanced mode and check the Secure mode box.

VPN

I started my testing of the hEX features by diving into IPSec VPNs. In my experience, IPSec tunnels often require a bit of configuration tweaking to get them to work and I wanted to see how hard it was going to be to get one working on MikroTik’s RouterOS. As an added challenge, the Wiki’s example for IPSec Site-to-Site must have been out of date, as I had to modify it a bit to get it to work.

After resetting the router to defaults, I tried the CLI configurations provided in the Wiki, which says it uses a default of 3DES encryption and SHA-1 authentication. I attempted to set up a Site-to-Site tunnel to my Linksys LRT224 with these options, but couldn’t get the tunnel to connect. The GUI came in handy, since it showed that the IPSec defaults were actually using AES-128, 192, and 256 encryption. I changed the LRT224 to use AES-128 encryption and the tunnel from the hEX to the LRT224 came up, shown below. I tried to configure a tunnel from the LRT224 to use AES-256, but wasn’t able to get that option working.

S2S VPN Established

Once the tunnel was established, I had intermittent connectivity through the tunnel between the LRT224 and hEX. I discovered one of the CLI commands provided in the RouterOS Wiki had a value that wasn’t accepted by the router. I played around with a few other options until I found one that worked, which made the tunnel stable.

I measured throughput over the IPSec VPN tunnel between the hEX and LRT224, using TotuSoft’s LAN Speed Test client and server application and two PCs running 64-bit Windows with their software firewall disabled. With one PC on the hEX LAN and the other PC on the LRT224 LAN, I measured peak upload throughput from the hEX to LRT224 at 53.3 Mbps and peak download throughput to the hEX from the LRT224 at 85.2 Mbps, using a 100 MB file size. Although a bit unbalanced, this throughput level compares favorably with the recently reviewed Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite. In similar tests between the EdgeRouter Lite and LRT224, I measured peak throughput at 51.5 Mbps.

L2TP and PPTP VPNs are other options for remote client VPN access to the hEX router. You can even try OpenVPN if you’re adventurous. I successfully set up a PPTP connection from a Windows PC to the hEX. The PPTP instructions on the RouterOS fell woefully short, but I found a simple step by step here. Using these instructions, I was able to successfully set up a PPTP remote client VPN connection to the hEX. The screenshot below shows my established PPTP connection.

PPTP Established

LAN and VLANs

The hEX has four 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports. You can control MTU size, create IP and GRE tunnels, add VLANs, implement Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP), channel bonding, and LTE interfaces for backup to your wired connections.

RouterOS supports port based and 802.1Q tagged VLANs. I was able to successfully test 802.1Q VLANs on the hEX router. Using the GUI, I added a test VLAN and attached it to the hEX’s LAN interface as shown below.

RouterOS VLANs

I then configured my test VLAN with an IP address and DHCP server. Using an 802.1Q capable access point connected to the hEX’s LAN with an SSID configured for both the default VLAN and my test VLAN, I was able to connect to both VLANs based on the SSID I attached to, validating the hEX’s VLAN tagging capability.

Firewall

The RouterOS firewall menu presents numerous firewall options for controlling traffic in and out of the hEX.

Filtering rules are added to an access control list and processed from top down. Traffic can be filtered by source and destination address, source and destination port, protocol, as well as inbound and outbound interfaces. NAT and VPN optimizations are also controlled via the firewall menu.

As mentioned previously, I created a firewall rule to allow Winbox access to the router’s WAN port to enable remote management access. The rule, shown below, involved accepting TCP traffic to port 8291, which appears to be the port Winbox uses to connect to the router.

RouterOS Firewall Rule

I also created a firewall rule to enable PPTP connections. For both of my firewall rules, I had to make sure they were listed above the final drop rule. The GUI comes in handy for this step as you can simply drag your newly created rule up the list to ensure it is processed before the final drop rule.

There are no web filtering options available to those who don’t want to deal with the CLI. But entering block websites into MikroTik Wiki search box, which uses Google search, came up with this article on configuring a proxy to do domain filtering.

QoS options are similarly not for the networking novice. Searching for QoS brought up this page, which is enough to make it clear that anyone looking for a point-and-click QoS menu is out of luck.

Advanced Network Features

In addition to the above features, the hEX offers MPLS, Routing, and Queuing options. At a high level, RouterOS MPLS options include enabling MPLS switching, Routing options include BGP, OSPF, and RIP protocols. Queuing options include simple bandwidth management. Aside from Queuing, which I’ll get to shortly, these are not options home networkers would need.

I applied a simple bandwidth management rule following the example shown here and ran before and after tests using TotuSoft’s LAN Speed Test tool. Unfortunately, my tests showed that bandwidth remained unchanged. I tried multiple combinations of configurations, but was unable to affect my throughput with any of the simple rules I tried.

Last, RouterOS offers multiple views into the traffic flows and activity on the network. From the interface screen, you can see live traffic going in and out the active interfaces, as shown below.

Interface Traffic

The System menu has multiple displays of the router’s health and performance. Below is a display of the System options.

System Menu

For example, a look at the Resources menu shows memory and CPU usage as shown below.

Resource Utilization

Performance

Testing by Tim Higgins

We ran the hEX through the Revision 10 performance test process with v6.39.2 firmware loaded, which was the most recent at time of test. As mentioned earlier, I later upgraded the firmware to v6.40.3 for my functional and feature review. The table summarizes router performance results.

Test Description MikroTik hEX WAN – LAN Throughput (Mbps)LAN – WAN Throughput (Mbps)HTTP Score – WAN to LAN (%)HTTP Score – LAN to WAN (%)Bufferbloat Score- Down Avg.Bufferbloat Score- Down Max.Bufferbloat Score- Up Avg.Bufferbloat Score- Up Max.CTF Score (%)Firmware Version
939
939
65.8
57.9
680
515
559
437
41.9
v6.39.2

The hEX maxed out the iperf-based WAN-LAN and LAN-WAN throughput tests, which don’t put much stress on the router. Bufferbloat scores were at the top of the Average and Maximum downlink charts, beating all other products, the EdgeRouter Lite included. But on uplink, the EdgeRouter Lite topped both average and maximum charts. For reference, all latency values, both average and maximum, ran between 1.5 and 2.3 ms.

WAN2LAN Performance

I compared the hEX HTTP scores against the Asus GT-AC5300 and the Ubiquiti EdgeMAX EdgeRouter Lite, the only two higher scoring routers for these benchmarks. The winner of the three remains the Asus, but the hEX held its own against the Asus and outperformed the EdgeRouter Lite in the smaller filesize tests running WAN to LAN.

LAN2WAN Performance

The CTF score is a measure of the effect on throughput when various routing features are enabled. Or in the hEX’s case, with “FastTrack” disabled, which is their term for Cut Through Forwarding. The chart below shows hEX’s throughput was reduced to around 42% of the normal 939 Mbps measured with the default state of FastTrack enabled. Note the EdgeRouter Lite did worse, dropping to 12.9% of normal throughput (~940 Mbps) when CTF was disabled on it.

microtik, rb750gr3, router, reviewed

CTF score

On a practical performance level, I initially experienced packet loss during my testing, indicated by intermittent periods of network slowness. Continuous ping tests also showed dropped packets. I tried resetting the router multiple times, yet the packet loss continued.

I initially thought the packet loss might be due to using the GUI at the same time as my testing, but that theory didn’t prove out as the packet loss occurred even when I wasn’t logged in.

Through the course of this review, I reset the router numerous times. At the end of my testing, I couldn’t duplicate the packet loss, so I’m not sure of the cause. Perhaps the problem was user error, perhaps just an anomaly. Nevertheless, it is important to mention.

Closing Thoughts

Amazon’s for the routers I compared to the hEX paints an interesting story. The Asus GT-AC5300 currently lists for 389, the EdgeRouter Lite lists for around 94, and the MikroTik hEX for 50. That’s an amazing difference in price for three devices with similar routing performance numbers! To be fair, the Asus GT-AC5300 is also a highly capable Wi-Fi router, while the Ubiquiti and MikroTik are wired-only routers, without Wi-Fi radios. Still, the hEX’s bang-for-the-buck is obvious if all you want is a capable, high-throughput wired-only router.

At the end of the day, I came away impressed with the massive amount of features in RouterOS loaded into such a small and inexpensive package. I was also very aware that I had only scratched the surface of its capabilities. I had success in configuring most of the features I tried, but also had experienced a temporary issue with packet loss and an inability to apply working bandwidth management.

The bottom line is the hEX is an inexpensive but powerful router for network experts and those who aspire to be. This is not the inexpensive plug-and-play router you’re looking for.

Mikrotik hex dual wan

Equipments for data routing in LAN/WLAN networks Available with Wi-Fi, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and/or SFP ports

Equipment for data switching in LAN/WLAN networks Models available with Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and/or SFP ports

” S mall O ffice H ome O ffice” EquipmentS for LAN/WLAN networks Typically used as routers, switches and / or Indoor Wi-Fi Access Point

380Mbps FDD Microwave Radio Links with IP / SFP interface Capacity of up to 380Mbps, 17 or 24GHz free Band, Full Duplex, Gbit and/or SFP port, 256QAM, Adaptive Code Modulation

900Mbps FDD Microwave Radio Links with IP /SFP interface Capacity of up to 900Mbps, 17 or 24GHz Free Band, full duplex, Gbit and/or SFP port, 1024QAM, Hitless Adaptive Code Modulation

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    Mikrotik hEX S RB760iGS, PoE Gigabit Router with SFP

    Router Mikrotik RB760iGS hEX S. 5x Gigabit Ethernet, SFP, Dual Core, 256MB RAM, USB, PoE in/out

    Availability date:

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    Mikrotik hEX S RB760iGS, PoE Gigabit Router with SFP Router Mikrotik RB760iGS hEX S. 5x Gigabit Ethernet, SFP, Dual Core, 256MB RAM, USB, PoE in/out

    Data sheet

    CPU FrequencyCPU core numberRAM on boardGigabit Ethernet portsUSB portsMemory cardPoE in802.3af supportDimensionsLicense levelSFP cagePoE out802.3at supportGigabit EthernetPoE out Numbers
    Environment work Indoor
    880 MHz
    2
    256 MB
    5
    1
    Yes
    Yes (Passive Poe)
    Yes
    113 x 89 x 28 mm
    4
    1
    Yes (passive PoE)
    si
    1

    info

    Mikrotik hEX S [RB960iGS] is a five-port Gigabit Ethernet router for places where wireless connectivity is not required. Compared to the hEX, the hEX S also has an SFP port and a PoE output on the last port.The router support DC voltage range from 12 up to 56Vdc thrugh jack or PoE port

    It is an affordable, small and easy-to-use Router, but at the same time it is equipped with a very powerful 880 MHz dual-core CPU and 256 MB RAM, capable of running all the advanced configurations supported by the proiprietary Mikrotik RouterOS operating system. The hEX S device has a USB 2.0 port, a PoE output for Ethernet port #5, and a 1.25Gbit/s SFP slot for optical fiber. Port #5 can power other passive PoE devices with the same voltage applied to the unit such as security cameras, Voip phones, Wireless Devices, etc.

    IPsec hardware encryption (~470 Mbps) and Dude server package is supported, with microSD slot providing higher r/w speed for file storage and Dude.

    Mikrotik RB760iGS also supports VLAN technology, which allows a network to be divided into multiple virtual networks, each with its own broadcast domain and routing protocols. This helps to better manage network traffic and maintain information security.

    It is possible, thanks to the powerful RouterOs operating system, to manage multiple Internet connections simultaneously, i distributing traffic among the different connections intelligently. This optimizes bandwidth utilization and ensures a fast and reliable Internet connection even if a connection is lost.

    Finally, the Mikrotik RB760iGS also offers advanced traffic control, which allows you to limit the available bandwidth for each connected device, control network accesses, and monitor network traffic in real time.

    In conclusion, the Mikrotik RB760iGS is a reliable and powerful desktop Gigabit Ethernet router that offers advanced features such as VLAN technology, traffic control, and countless Routing and QoS capabilities. With an 880 MHz dual-core processor, 256 MB RAM and 16 MB flash memory, this router provides high performance and stable network management, while Gigabit Ethernet WAN and LAN ports make it easy to connect multiple devices and share a fast and reliable Internet connection.

    Syed Jahanzaib – Personal Blog to Share Knowledge !

    Mikrotik DUAL WAN Load Balancing using PCC method. Complete Script ! by zaiB

    This post illustrates on how you can configure load balancing of multiple wan links using Mikrotik Routerboard hardware (or RouterOS x86 version). In this example I have used Mikrotik Routerboard CCR 1036 model. Don’t forget to rename the interface names accordingly if you are a copy paste fan

    • 2 ports were connected with two difference DSL Routers
    • and 3rd port was connected with User LAN.
    • Both DSL are of same speed. i.e 10 Mb each.

    DSL MODEM IP’S

    In this example, we are using PCC (per connection classifier) method to achieve the load balancing. There are few options using this approach each option may give you different results.

    Example#2: both-addresses-and-ports

    ~Syed Jahanzaib

    PCC Script !

    All Done ! Now Test the link by putting user load, the more multiple users load you put on it, the better Load Balance result you will get

    PCC WITH UN-EQUAL WAN LINKS

    If you have Un-Equal WAN Links, for example WAN,1 is of 4MB and WAN,2 is of 8 Mb, and you want to force MT to use WAN2 link more then other because of its capacity, Then you have to Add more PCC rules assigning the same two marks to a specific link i.e WAN2. something like

    /ip address add address=192.168.0.1/24 network=192.168.0.0 broadcast=192.168.0.255 interface=Local add address=192.168.1.2/24 network=192.168.1.0 broadcast=192.168.1.255 interface=WAN1 add address=192.168.2.2/24 network=192.168.2.0 broadcast=192.168.2.255 interface=WAN2 /ip dns set allow-remote-requests=yes cache-max-ttl=1w cache-size=5000KiB max-udp-packet-size=512 servers=8.8.8.8 /ip firewall mangle add chain=input in-interface=WAN1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn add chain=input in-interface=WAN2 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN2_conn add chain=output connection-mark=WAN1_conn action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN1 add chain=output connection-mark=WAN2_conn action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN2 add chain=prerouting dst-address=192.168.1.0/24 action=accept in-interface=Local add chain=prerouting dst-address=192.168.2.0/24 action=accept in-interface=Local add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/0 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN2_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting connection-mark=WAN1_conn in-interface=Local action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN1 add chain=prerouting connection-mark=WAN2_conn in-interface=Local action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN2 /ip route add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.1.1 routing-mark=to_WAN1 check-gateway=ping add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.2.1 routing-mark=to_WAN2 check-gateway=ping add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.1.1 distance=1 check-gateway=ping add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.2.1 distance=2 check-gateway=ping /ip firewall nat add chain=srcnat out-interface=WAN1 action=masquerade add chain=srcnat out-interface=WAN2 action=masquerade

    PCC WITH HOTSPOT (Reference)

    /ip firewall nat add action=accept chain=pre-hotspot disabled=no dst-address-type=!local hotspot=auth

    7 Комментарии и мнения владельцев »

    hi plz contact me…. and tell me where you live…… am Shahzad form pakistan/multan my phone number # 0092312-6460823 Like Liked by 1 person Comment by shahzad — July 31, 2011 @ 5:42 AM

    You can contact me at my email address. aacable [at] hotmail.com / 0092333.xxxxxxx Like Liked by 1 person Comment by Pinochio / zaib — July 31, 2011 @ 6:05 AM

    Dear, how can you make the router make load balancing on tow interfaces i will use one for my hotspote and the other for my internal LAN Like Like Comment by mtaherhassanin — December 27, 2012 @ 9:59 AM

    Describe in details. Like Liked by 1 person Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — December 27, 2012 @ 3:06 PM

    I Have RB 750GL with 5 Ports i will use 3 Ports for WANs DSL Routers. the rest 2 Ports i will Use them 1 For my LAN and 1 For My HotSpot Bullet. i Used your Script from the Above as the followng /ip dns set allow-remote-requests=yes cache-max-ttl=1w cache-size=5000KiB max-udp-packet-size=512 servers=41.128.225.225,41.128.225.226,163.121.128.135 /ip firewall mangle add chain=input in-interface=WAN1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn add chain=input in-interface=WAN2 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN2_conn add chain=output connection-mark=WAN1_conn action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN1 add chain=output connection-mark=WAN2_conn action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN2 add chain=prerouting dst-address=192.168.2.0/24 action=accept in-interface=Local——– This for my Lan add chain=prerouting dst-address=192.168.3.0/24 action=accept in-interface=Local add chain=prerouting dst-address=192.168.2.0/24 action=accept in-interface=Local2———— this for my Hotspot add chain=prerouting dst-address=192.168.3.0/24 action=accept in-interface=Local2 add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/0 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN2_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/2 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local2 per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/0 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN2_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local2 per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting dst-address-type=!local in-interface=Local2 per-connection-classifier=both-addresses-and-ports:2/2 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=WAN1_conn passthrough=yes add chain=prerouting connection-mark=WAN1_conn in-interface=Local action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN1 add chain=prerouting connection-mark=WAN2_conn in-interface=Local action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=to_WAN2 /ip route add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.2.254 routing-mark=to_WAN1 check-gateway=ping add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.3.254 routing-mark=to_WAN2 check-gateway=ping add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.2.254 distance=1 check-gateway=ping add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.3.254 distance=2 check-gateway=ping /ip firewall nat add chain=srcnat out-interface=WAN1 action=masquerade add chain=srcnat out-interface=WAN2 action=masquerade /ip firewall nat add action=accept chain=pre-hotspot disabled=no dst-address-type=!local hotspot=auth but i belive that my hot spot Not Acting well Like Like Comment by mtaherhassanin — December 30, 2012 @ 5:20 AM

    Hello Dear Well i have a Question in RB 750 Mikrotik Local Interface Pluged To ISA Server Local2 Pluged To Hotspot System I am Behind the ISA Server how can i mange to make the PING to the Hotspot system succeded Local 192.168.88.0/24 Local2 192.168.80.0/24 Like Like Comment by mtaherhassanin — December 31, 2012 @ 10:29 AM

    Dear sir can it possible on 3g modem? EVO PTCL Like Like Comment by Rana Aamir — July 20, 2012 @ 9:35 PM

    Plz help me with a scrip for a b750 3 adsl 4mb wan 192.168.2.1 dns 196.7.7.7 192.168.3.1 192.168.4.1 lan 192.168.7.1 hotspot 192.168.8.1 thanks ben Like Like Comment by Ben Heydenrych — June 29, 2013 @ 10:06 PM

    How can i achieve load balancing with these typr of setup. 2 wan and 1 hotspot LAN. normal web/light browsing traffic should be directed to WAN1 while heavy and other traffic should go to WAN 2. Like Like Comment by Collins — August 1, 2011 @ 3:26 PM

    You have to do policy base load balancing. or you can mark packets for specific traffic and route it to your desired WAN link. Like Like Comment by Pinochio / zaib — August 4, 2011 @ 6:03 AM

    i am also enabled proxy because WAN1 is billing me based on volume of data i use. Like Like Comment by Collins — August 1, 2011 @ 4:01 PM

    hello sir i am aman can you help me how mikrotik load balasing and modem setting what is your mobile no and your E-mail Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 1, 2011 @ 4:05 PM

    my name is Aman farooqi plz you help me from pakistan RAWAlpindi mikrotik load balascing how make and how modem settend Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 1, 2011 @ 4:11 PM

    you can contact me at aacable at hotmail.com Like Like Comment by Pinochio / zaib — August 4, 2011 @ 6:03 AM

    jhanzaib sb skyp ke ID ager ap deyea tu baat ho sakti hay ya cell fone mai 03112910453 Like Like Comment by faisal — March 30, 2014 @ 5:13 AM

    / ip address add address=1.1.0.5/24 network=1.1.0.0 broadcast=1.1.0.255 interface=Local comment=”” disabled=no add address=10.0.0.10/24 network=10.0.0.0 broadcast=10.0.0.255 interface=wan1 comment=”” disabled=no add address=7.7.7.10/24 network=7.7.7.0 broadcast=7.7.7.255 interface=wan2 comment=”” disabled=no / ip firewall mangle add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-state=new nth=2,1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=conn1 passthrough=yes comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-mark=conn1 action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=conn1 passthrough=no comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-state=new nth=1,1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=conn2 passthrough=yes comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-mark=conn2 action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=conn2 passthrough=no comment=”” disabled=no / ip firewall nat add chain=srcnat connection-mark=conn1 action=masquerade out-interface=wan1 comment=”” disabled=no add chain=srcnat connection-mark=conn2 action=masquerade out-interface=wan2 comment=”” disabled=no / ip route add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=10.0.0.138 scope=255 target-scope=10 routing-mark=conn1 comment=”” disabled=no add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=7.7.7.7 scope=255 target-scope=10 routing-mark=conn2 comment=”” disabled=no Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 4, 2011 @ 11:21 PM

    ware is this problam khaa par masllha ho sakta hai Kia modem ki setting bhi karni hai aghr karni hai to Kia ya is main problam, hai Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 4, 2011 @ 11:25 PM

    / ip address add address=1.1.0.5/24 network=1.1.0.0 broadcast=1.1.0.255 interface=Local comment=”” disabled=no add address=1.1.0.77/24 network=1.1.0.0 broadcast=1.1.0.255 interface=wan1 comment=”” disabled=no add address=5.5.5.1/24 network=5.5.5.0 broadcast=5.5.5.255 interface=wan2 comment=”” disabled=no / ip firewall mangle add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-state=new nth=2,1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=conn1 passthrough=yes comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-mark=conn1 action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=conn1 passthrough=no comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-state=new nth=1,1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=conn2 passthrough=yes comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-mark=conn2 action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=conn2 passthrough=no comment=”” disabled=no / ip firewall nat add chain=srcnat connection-mark=conn1 action=masquerade out-interface=wan1 comment=”” disabled=no add chain=srcnat connection-mark=conn2 action=masquerade out-interface=wan2 comment=”” disabled=no / ip route add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=1.1.0.5 scope=255 target-scope=10 routing-mark=conn1 comment=”” disabled=no add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=5.5.5.1 scope=255 target-scope=10 routing-mark=conn2 comment=”” disabled=no Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 5, 2011 @ 6:57 PM

    First turn off dhcp server seetings in modem than try…good luck Like Like Comment by Faisal — August 13, 2011 @ 10:31 PM

    ab yeh sahi kar bhi liya hai tab bhi net nahi chal rahaa hai plz help me ab Kia karo yeh load balasing is liye kar rha hoo is se net ki 4mb aur 4mb ke speed 8 ati hai is liye plz ab dekhye Kia karoblam hai Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 5, 2011 @ 6:59 PM

    This is nth base load balancing which will give you some problems in steaming. https web sites etc. but try it anyways since its the simplest way to do load balance. Make some changes to your IP scheme. Change ‘Local’ interface IP to 10.0.0.1 Change ‘WAN1’ ip to 192.168.1.1 Change ‘WAN2’ ip to 192.168.2.1 Change ‘WAN1’ DSL ROUTER LAN IP to 192.168.1.2 Change ‘WAN2’ DSL ROUTER LAN IP to 192.168.2.2 Now moving on to script. / ip address add address=10.0.0.1 network=10.0.0.0 broadcast=10.0.0.255 interface=Local comment=”” disabled=no add address=192.168.1.1/24 network=192.168.1.0 broadcast=192.168.1.255 interface=wan1 comment=”” disabled=no add address=192.168.2.1/24 network=192.168.2.0 broadcast=192.168.2.255 interface=wan2 comment=”” disabled=no / ip firewall mangle add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-state=new nth=2,1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=conn1 passthrough=yes comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-mark=conn1 action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=conn1 passthrough=no comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-state=new nth=1,1 action=mark-connection new-connection-mark=conn2 passthrough=yes comment=”” disabled=no add chain=prerouting in-interface=Local connection-mark=conn2 action=mark-routing new-routing-mark=conn2 passthrough=no comment=”” disabled=no / ip firewall nat add chain=srcnat connection-mark=conn1 action=masquerade out-interface=wan1 comment=”” disabled=no add chain=srcnat connection-mark=conn2 action=masquerade out-interface=wan2 comment=”” disabled=no / ip route add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.1.2 scope=255 target-scope=10 routing-mark=conn1 comment=”” disabled=no add dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=192.168.2.2 scope=255 target-scope=10 routing-mark=conn2 comment=”” disabled=no Like Like Comment by Pinochio / zaib — August 6, 2011 @ 6:32 AM

    would you please give me Mikrotik DUAL WAN Load Balancing using PCC method in simple word i need 4WAN merging Like Like Comment by zain ul abdin — January 26, 2012 @ 4:16 PM

    Can you be more specific what you meant by ‘Simple Words’ The tutorial is complete reference guide. You can use it and modify it according to your need. Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — January 27, 2012 @ 11:23 AM

    plz sir help me how pcc load balasing 3.22 Like Like Comment by Aman Manifarooqi — August 15, 2011 @ 11:08 PM

    I have implemented DUAL (2) WAN Load Balancing using PCC method and it is working fine without hotspot. But I want to implement this PCC method with hotspot service. Please let me know what I should do now. Like Like Comment by Kafi — August 22, 2011 @ 11:45 AM

    Dear Kafi, I have never tested load balancing with HOTSPOT scenario, but what I have heard or read at forums, hotspot messes with load balancing method. But give it a try and share your experience with us. Like Like Comment by Pinochio / zaib — August 22, 2011 @ 11:51 AM

    Yes this is very much possible achieving this kind of load balancing. Even RRD can get equal LB, but I will not recommend you to use RDD base algorithm as it have some issues with many sites n protocols. Use PCC instead. Just make sure that all users are hitting Mikrotik directly (where PCC is configured) The more users load you put on PCC, the better load balancing you will be able to get. Like Like Comment by Pinochio / zaib — August 24, 2011 @ 10:50 AM

    Wow…. Amazing. How to do this with 2 WAN only? Like Like Comment by Danish Jamil — April 3, 2012 @ 1:52 PM

    bhai mai ny 2 pc mai mikrotik install Kia hai 1 mai load balancing ki hai aur dosry mai user add hai aur per connetion classifier ko ma ny dst address pa set Kia hai. Kia yeh sahi hai yaha is sy b better ho akta hai…. dsl1 dsl2———–mikrotik pcc (dst address)——–mikrotik pppoe server——-clients dsl3 Like Like Comment by usmans — August 28, 2011 @ 1:01 AM

    usman bhai mujay apna koi contect nuber dain plz mene loadbalsing ki kuch help lani hai app se Like Like Comment by sadaq — July 30, 2012 @ 8:38 AM

    dst-address works fine too. All depend on your usage scenario. You can configure pcc and pppoe on the same server. in this way you can use src-address as your classifier. Like Liked by 1 person Comment by Pinochio / zaib — August 28, 2011 @ 10:54 AM

    bhai agar mai pcc aur pppoe same sever mai configure karta ho to jab mai us mai thunder cache ka mangle rule add karta ho to wo work nai karta…is liy mai 2 server use kar raha ho…. Like Like Comment by usmans — August 28, 2011 @ 2:07 PM

    Great to use PCC to load balance, but I don’t know I’m using nth is better at my network… Like Like Comment by another mikrotik tips — September 24, 2011 @ 9:30 AM

    PCC is a very customizable and enhanced version of Load balancing as compared to NTH. Using PCC you can get rid of many problems found in NTH, for example, broken http/https link, streaming issues and some others. (Using pcc with src-address as classifier.) Anyhow if NTH is fulfilling your requirements and you are satisfied with the results, you can stick with it as loon as it doesn’t bother you Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — September 24, 2011 @ 10:30 AM

    im having one wan link- 4 Mb ,another one is 2Mb, is it is possible to loadbalance with pcc Like Like Comment by tamilmaran — October 28, 2011 @ 8:31 AM

    yes you can, Just give create more pcc rule to give priority to 4mb rule, so 2mb will be used twice as compare to 2 mb, to get some balanced load balancing. Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — October 28, 2011 @ 12:33 PM

    can u pls. edit n give me the script, im poor in scripting… Like Like Comment by tamilmaran — June 26, 2012 @ 12:02 AM

    Hi, I also have rb750. Now I want to do load balancing on 2 dsl lines. How will I know that port 1 is Local, port 2 is WAN1 ans so on? Also for WAN1 dsl is the IP address 192.168.1.1? And for WAN2 dsl is the IP address 192.168.2.1? Like Like Comment by Nouman Aziz — November 12, 2011 @ 4:59 PM

    You can check port status by various ways. Following command will blink the port light. /interface ethernet blink ether1 OR /interface ethernet monitor ether1 /interface ethernet monitor ether2 /interface ethernet monitor ether3 Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — November 14, 2011 @ 10:38 AM

    Sir I want to access winbox from wan port….please advice. i have public static IP at my adsl router.i have add port forwading in router …port is 8291 : what i do at my 750GL router ….microtik router wan IP is 192.168.0.100 …and adsl router lan IP is 192.168.0.1…please advice …\ Regards Like Like Comment by faisalmirzapk — April 10, 2013 @ 7:18 PM

    dear sir, i want to implement fcc method with pppoe server in 1mikrotik OS x86 pc…. how to do that? kindly help me ASAP……;) Like Like Comment by fareed — November 16, 2011 @ 9:14 AM

    i have 2 Satellite internet connections and i want to do loadbalancing and i have 2 diffrent public ips. Like Like Comment by fareed — November 16, 2011 @ 9:17 AM

    3 wan load balancing, no need to set static IP to the interfaces; multiple ADSL services and the Mikrotik PCC rules along with some inbound mangling to allow a single router to load balance traffic across as many non bonded links as required. credits to: http://www.mikrotik-routeros.com/?p=12 Note that none of this config requires the use of IP addresses at all, as it simply uses the pppoe-client interfaces and your lan interface to mark traffic. In my example wan1-pppoe,wan2-pppoe,wan3-pppoe are used and lan /ip route add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 3 – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=wan3 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 2 – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 1 – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 1 – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 2 – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 3 – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=wan3 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 1 – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 2 – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 3 – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=wan3 add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe add check-gateway=arp comment=”Static Route – WAN1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=static-wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”Static Route – WAN2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=static-wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”Static Route – WAN3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=static-wan3 /ip firewall mangle add action=mark-connection chain=input comment=”Mark new inbound connection wan1″ connection-state=new disabled=no in-interface=wan1-pppoe new-connection-mark=wan1 \ passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=input comment=”Mark new inbound connection wan2″ connection-state=new disabled=no in-interface=wan2-pppoe new-connection-mark=wan2 \ passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=input comment=”Mark new inbound connection wan3″ connection-state=new disabled=no in-interface=wan3-pppoe new-connection-mark=wan3 \ passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established inbound connection wan1″ connection-state=established disabled=no in-interface=wan1-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan1 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established inbound connection wan2″ connection-state=established disabled=no in-interface=wan2-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan2 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established inbound connection wan3″ connection-state=established disabled=no in-interface=wan3-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan3 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related inbound connection wan1″ connection-state=related disabled=no in-interface=wan1-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan1 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related inbound connection wan2″ connection-state=related disabled=no in-interface=wan2-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan2 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related inbound connection wan3″ connection-state=related disabled=no in-interface=wan3-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan3 passthrough=yes add action=mark-routing chain=output comment=”Mark new inbound route wan1″ connection-mark=wan1 disabled=no new-routing-mark=static-wan1 passthrough=no add action=mark-routing chain=output comment=”Mark new inbound route wan2″ connection-mark=wan2 disabled=no new-routing-mark=static-wan2 passthrough=no add action=mark-routing chain=output comment=”Mark new inbound route wan3″ connection-mark=wan3 disabled=no new-routing-mark=static-wan3 passthrough=no add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 1″ connection-state=new disabled=no \ dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/0 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 2″ connection-state=new disabled=no \ dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/1 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 3″ connection-state=new disabled=no \ dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/2 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 1″ connection-state=\ established disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=\ both-addresses:3/0 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 2″ connection-state=\ established disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=\ both-addresses:3/1 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 3″ connection-state=\ established disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=\ both-addresses:3/2 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 1″ connection-state=related \ disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/0 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 2″ connection-state=related \ disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/1 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 3″ connection-state=related \ disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/2 add action=mark-routing chain=prerouting comment=”Mark routing for PCC mark – option 1″ connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn disabled=no new-routing-mark=wan1 passthrough=\ yes add action=mark-routing chain=prerouting comment=”Mark routing for PCC mark – option 2″ connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn disabled=no new-routing-mark=wan2 passthrough=\ yes add action=mark-routing chain=prerouting comment=”Mark routing for PCC mark – option 3″ connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn disabled=no new-routing-mark=wan3 passthrough=\ yes Like Like Comment by adrian — November 26, 2011 @ 7:25 AM

    Hi, what about NAT rules ? (script in IP-Firewall-NAT) Like Like Comment by esalehnet — November 29, 2012 @ 1:30 AM

    Is this line typo? add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe Like Like Comment by maximusmx — October 1, 2021 @ 1:48 PM

    I dont think so, hav eyou tried with /ip route section? I dont have any router to test it at a moment. Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — October 4, 2021 @ 3:16 PM

    is is working OK to me, after I modified a bit to use only 2 wans on my router Like Like Comment by adrian — November 26, 2011 @ 7:29 AM

    Jahanzaib Bhai I need your help Would you……………. Like Like Comment by Umair Hanif — December 4, 2011 @ 8:28 PM

    i have mikrotik 3.22 and i want to use 2 WAN link load balancing Like Like Comment by umair — December 13, 2011 @ 11:03 PM

    You need at least ver 3.30 for pcc base load balancing. Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — December 14, 2011 @ 10:42 AM

    These are great scripts, but could you possibly explain how to change the gateway check to check a remote IP address rather than the gateway IP address (for instances where the DSL line may be down, but the modem still up) – im sure its not as easy as just changing the IP address in the check? Like Like Comment by David — December 22, 2011 @ 4:26 PM

    You are right, its not that easy to integrate netwatch with the PCC. I stopped working on this script long time ago. I will do some rd on it and will update the article accordingly. Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — December 23, 2011 @ 10:59 AM

    Salam Dear Sir. Sir ap kasy hai.umied hai k ap thek hai.ALLAH ap per desta shufqat rakha.Sir main UBNT wireless setup laga raha hun.Aur sir mujha ap say kuch help ke zaroorat hai.wo ya k main us k liya mikrotik ka kon sa ver use karun uar mikrotik ruterbord kon sa purchas karun.qk es ma humara pass dedicated links be hai.aur SIR humara owner ya chata hai k ptcl jasie wireless modem ma setting ho. SIR Cache server be creat karna hai kindly ap us ka be bta dijya ga. Sir main umied karta hun k ap jaldi aur bhater jawab send kary gia. Waqas sabir from Faisalabad. E-mail = the2ndlastguy@yahoo.com Mob= 03157215729 Like Like Comment by Muhammad Waqas Sabir — August 30, 2012 @ 10:54 PM

    Hi, Sir I have done dual wan load balancing on MK RB750 v 5.9. I have two 4 mbps connection. The problem I am facing is the second dsl line is not much is use. Sometimes I get 7-8 mB speed but sometimes it drops out so I just left with the 4MB. Any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks. Like Like Comment by Nouman Aziz — December 23, 2011 @ 1:05 AM

    If ‘sometimes’ you able to get 7-8 mbps. then your PCC is configure okay. what classifier are you using? Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — December 23, 2011 @ 10:57 AM

    I am using Dst.Address for both lines. Like Like Comment by Nouman Aziz — December 25, 2011 @ 12:10 AM

    It will happen if you use dst-address, for example if there are 10 online users and 8 of them are using you tube.com, then PCC will bind you-tube at first dsl link, and other web at other link. You have to read a lot on PCC classifier, goto wiki and read thoroughly then play with this option. Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — December 25, 2011 @ 9:44 AM

    Can you please explain me which classifier do I change and how? Thanks. Like Like Comment by Nouman Aziz — December 25, 2011 @ 12:43 PM

    Dear Noman, I guess its time for you to do some research and read teh mikrotik wiki on How PCC works. Please start with this one and you will get idea on which classifier is best for you. http://wiki.mikrotik.com/wiki/How_PCC_works_(beginner) After all its your network and you have to decide what classifer to use depends on your network usage. Please Read, Read and Read. Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — December 25, 2011 @ 10:17 PM

    sir muhe yee bataye ke x86 main bhi pcc load balasing ho sakti hai Like Like Comment by noman — December 31, 2011 @ 7:20 PM

    It doesn’t matter what architecture you use. you can do it on x86 or any RB. Just make sure you use ver 3.30 or above. preferably latest 5.x series. Like Like Comment by Pinochio~:) — December 31, 2011 @ 9:17 PM

    min ne computer par install Kia hai mikrotik ko pcc load balasing chaliy gi Like Like Comment by noman — December 31, 2011 @ 9:23 PM

    yes if u configure it properly. Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — January 2, 2012 @ 9:59 AM

    Sir, This load balancing works great when we put a load on it (browse heavy site, or watch YouTube). Is there any way to keep both WAN’s alive and working equally. For example even when we browse lite sites it should use both lines 50/50. Thanks Like Like Comment by nominet — January 4, 2012 @ 3:45 PM

    Try using different classifier. There are 8 various, test which one works for you best Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — January 4, 2012 @ 4:03 PM

    I have tried them and I liked ‘scr-address’ and ‘both-addresses and ports’ one. Like Like Comment by Nouman — January 5, 2012 @ 12:26 AM

    ‘Failover’ It will always check the modem status before sending any packets, If the modem is not reachable it will not send the packets. Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — January 6, 2012 @ 10:55 AM

    I want to add another WAN3 with the IP 192.168.3.1 Can you please write a script for me thanks. Like Like Comment by Asad — January 6, 2012 @ 11:27 AM

    /ip route add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 3 – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=wan3 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 2 – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 1 – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 1 – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 2 – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 3 – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=wan3 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 1 – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 2 – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”WAN 3 – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=wan3 add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 2″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe add check-gateway=arp comment=”Default Route – Distance 3″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe add check-gateway=arp comment=”Static Route – WAN1″ disabled=no distance=1 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan1-pppoe routing-mark=static-wan1 add check-gateway=arp comment=”Static Route – WAN2″ disabled=no distance=2 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan2-pppoe routing-mark=static-wan2 add check-gateway=arp comment=”Static Route – WAN3″ disabled=no distance=3 dst-address=0.0.0.0/0 gateway=wan3-pppoe routing-mark=static-wan3 /ip firewall mangle add action=mark-connection chain=input comment=”Mark new inbound connection wan1″ connection-state=new disabled=no in-interface=wan1-pppoe new-connection-mark=wan1 \ passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=input comment=”Mark new inbound connection wan2″ connection-state=new disabled=no in-interface=wan2-pppoe new-connection-mark=wan2 \ passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=input comment=”Mark new inbound connection wan3″ connection-state=new disabled=no in-interface=wan3-pppoe new-connection-mark=wan3 \ passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established inbound connection wan1″ connection-state=established disabled=no in-interface=wan1-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan1 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established inbound connection wan2″ connection-state=established disabled=no in-interface=wan2-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan2 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established inbound connection wan3″ connection-state=established disabled=no in-interface=wan3-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan3 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related inbound connection wan1″ connection-state=related disabled=no in-interface=wan1-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan1 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related inbound connection wan2″ connection-state=related disabled=no in-interface=wan2-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan2 passthrough=yes add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related inbound connection wan3″ connection-state=related disabled=no in-interface=wan3-pppoe \ new-connection-mark=wan3 passthrough=yes add action=mark-routing chain=output comment=”Mark new inbound route wan1″ connection-mark=wan1 disabled=no new-routing-mark=static-wan1 passthrough=no add action=mark-routing chain=output comment=”Mark new inbound route wan2″ connection-mark=wan2 disabled=no new-routing-mark=static-wan2 passthrough=no add action=mark-routing chain=output comment=”Mark new inbound route wan3″ connection-mark=wan3 disabled=no new-routing-mark=static-wan3 passthrough=no add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 1″ connection-state=new disabled=no \ dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/0 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 2″ connection-state=new disabled=no \ dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/1 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 3″ connection-state=new disabled=no \ dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/2 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 1″ connection-state=\ established disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=\ both-addresses:3/0 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 2″ connection-state=\ established disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=\ both-addresses:3/1 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark established traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 3″ connection-state=\ established disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=\ both-addresses:3/2 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 1″ connection-state=related \ disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/0 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 2″ connection-state=related \ disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/1 add action=mark-connection chain=prerouting comment=”Mark related traffic that isn’t local with PCC mark rand (3 possibilities) – option 3″ connection-state=related \ disabled=no dst-address-type=!local in-interface=lan new-connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn passthrough=yes per-connection-classifier=both-addresses:3/2 add action=mark-routing chain=prerouting comment=”Mark routing for PCC mark – option 1″ connection-mark=wan1_pcc_conn disabled=no new-routing-mark=wan1 passthrough=\ yes add action=mark-routing chain=prerouting comment=”Mark routing for PCC mark – option 2″ connection-mark=wan2_pcc_conn disabled=no new-routing-mark=wan2 passthrough=\ yes add action=mark-routing chain=prerouting comment=”Mark routing for PCC mark – option 3″ connection-mark=wan3_pcc_conn disabled=no new-routing-mark=wan3 passthrough=\ yes after that all you need to do is make your 3 pppoe client conections coresponding to your wans, pppoe client cone3ctions with user and pass provided from yout ISP, and in NAT…make a masquerade in IP firewall nat… click to add net nat rule, Chain – scrnat….than go to Action tab and select masquerade… that is all this config is the config that I am using on a rb750, for 3 wans Like Like Comment by Acidu — January 6, 2012 @ 6:40 PM

    Hi Sir, What is the function of distance in routes? Like Like Comment by Asad — January 6, 2012 @ 8:34 PM

    Hi, thanks for the great howto. I have a setup with 2 WANs and when I vpn to the router I can no longer ping or connect to the local addresses. Local interface is: 192.168.0.0/24 VPN local address is: 10.0.1.100 VPN remote address is: 10.0.2.100 Before setting up the load balancing I was able to connect to 192.168.0.102 or 192.168.0.101. Like Like Comment by quinametin — January 18, 2012 @ 10:05 AM

    Just create an address list (vpn subnet included) and on the mangle rules exclude them. e.g src-address-list=!pptpusers and dst-address-list=!pptpusers For more info, read Комментарии и мнения владельцев in following article, few guiys made it worked with pcc. https://aacable.wordpress.com/2011/06/04/mikrotik-4-wan-load-balance-pcc-complete-script-by-zaib/ Like Like Comment by Syed Jahanzaib / Pinochio~:) — January 18, 2012 @ 10:38 AM

    Ok, found it I had to add to firewall. nat a masquerade with the source 10.0.2.0/24 Like Like Comment by quinametin — January 18, 2012 @ 11:14 AM

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