Home Reviews Logitech G502 Lightspeed Review: Expensive Mousing Excellence. Logitech powerplay compatible mice
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Logitech G502 Lightspeed Review: Expensive Mousing Excellence. Logitech powerplay compatible mice

Never charge your mouse again with Logitech’s brilliant PowerPlay

Logitech is making a name for itself in the PC gaming market. We’ve seen high quality products pass through our hands over the last few years, and as of late, the company’s Logitech G brand has become somewhat of a staple in esports, which demands nothing but the best for high-performance, high-precision gaming.

Yet the Logitech G brand aims to be innovative, too. Lurking in the background over the past three years was a secret product designed to push the envelope even further. The team set out to eliminate the cord tethering mice to PCs, and has done just that.

The result? Logitech’s 100 PowerPlay Wireless Charging System. It includes the PowerPlay base, a PowerCore module, the hard mouse mat, the cloth mouse mat, and a 6-foot braided USB cord. The mice tested in this review are sold separately.

We had a chance to test Logitech’s PowerPlay system prior to its launch. The provided press-only kit included not only the kit, but also two of Logitech’s compatible PC gaming mice.

This is no simple mouse mat

The first component, the PowerPlay Charging Base, is quite large, measuring 13.54 inches wide and 12.60 inches deep. The base is only 2mm thick, and you can clearly see the flat, wireless charging antennas embedded within when viewing at just the right angle. In the top-left corner you’ll find the small, attached control module, which is responsible for providing wireless connectivity, and sending power to the antennas.

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review
logitech, g502, lightspeed, review
logitech, g502, lightspeed, review
logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

These embedded antennas are what create a vertical energy field based on electromagnetic resonance. The field doesn’t reside over the entire surface of the charging base, but instead occupies the middle three-quarters. This field has a height of up to 4mm from the surface of the base, so the mat must remain within a specific thickness, or else the mouse won’t charge. So, not all mouse mats will work with the PowerPlay system.

PowerPlay charges the mouse battery while providing wireless connectivity.

The pre-production package sent to us included two mouse mats. One had a cloth surface measuring 2mm thick, and the other had a hard (but bendable) surface measuring 3mm thick. The included mats were specifically designed for the charging base, but any mouse mat can be used on the PowerPlay system. However, Logitech says that unapproved mats can degrade the power field.

As for the control module, it connects to a PC through a six-foot-long, removable USB cable. Like many Logitech G products, this cable has a three-prong connector. One attaches to the control module’s USB port, and two serve as anchors for stability. The module includes an illuminated Logitech G logo that can be customized through the company’s desktop software. There’s also an LED that stays fully lit during the charging process, and half-lit when the pad is connected to the module but on standby (not charging).

The second component of the PowerPlay system is the kit’s included PowerCore module. It’s about as large as a silver dollar, and fits into the PowerCore port on the bottom of a compatible mouse by “snapping” into place via magnets. The module includes embedded antennas that pick up the energy generated from the charging pad, and converts that energy into a voltage that’s used to recharge the peripheral’s internal battery. The included magnets not only serve as an anchor for the module, but also serves as contacts for passing the electrical current from the module to the rechargeable battery.

A slow, steady charge

The PowerCore module takes 12 to 14 hours to fully charge a dead battery if the mouse isn’t in full use. If you’re using the mouse, then the recharge rate is five times that amount. If the mouse battery is completely dead, then it can’t be used for up to five minutes as the pad sends a charge to the module to revive the battery.

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

The best solution, it seems, is to fully charge the mouse battery using a USB cable, and then rely on the charging pad to keep the battery sustained at a high level. Thus, when you’re sleeping at night, the charging pad can max out the battery capacity.

The Logitech G team set out to eliminate the cord for good, and has done just that.

According to Logitech, the PowerPlay module charges the mouse battery up to 95 percent, and then restarts when the battery reaches 80 percent capacity. The only way to determine the charging process state is via the LED on the charging base’s control module, which dims when on standby, and brightens when charging. The LED only lights up when the PowerCore module contacts the charging pad’s electromagnetic field.

Whether the system’s charging speed matters will depend on how you use the mouse. It’s not ideal if you move one mouse for use off the PowerPlay base, and then return. Stick to the base, though, and you’ll never run out of juice. That’s a boon for gamers, who are always worried about how long a mouse will last.

However, keep in mind that the PowerPlay system can only charge one mouse at a time. It also cannot be used on a surface that conducts energy, like a metal table. The base itself is hard to keep clean too, as the rubbery surface tightly clings to dust and other funk that falls away from humans. The included cloth mat can be just as bad.

What about the compatible mice?

Right now, there are only two compatible units: the G903 (150) and the G703 (100). The G903 is the more “elite” version of the two, sporting nine programmable buttons. The G903 is ambidextrous in nature, as it comes with a second pair of removable side buttons to accommodate left-handed gamers. These two buttons are held in magnetically, and stored in a padded case with a hard shell.

This case also comes equipped with a USB dongle if you’re not using the charging pad. There’s an included weight that can be slipped into the PowerCore port’s cap if the module isn’t installed. This weight is the size of a silver dollar, and helps anchor the mouse during movement for PC gamers who like “heavy” peripherals.

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

The G903 also has an illuminated Logitech G logo supporting 16.8 million colors, which can be customized through Logitech’s desktop software. There are three set LED strips, too, that display the current DPI setting. This may be somewhat confusing at first, because the mouse provides five customizable settings ranging from 200 to 12,000 DPI.

Opting for the more affordable G703 requires sacrifice. It only includes five programmable buttons (outside the DPI cycling buttons), and is built only for right-handed gamers. However, there are two customizable lighting zones – the Logitech G logo, and a thin strip circling the mouse wheel’s perimeter. Its sensitivity ranges from 200 to 12,000 DPI as well, and a single DPI cycling button supports four customizable levels.

PowerPlay is expensive, but it works

Logitech is pushing innovation forward with the launch of its PowerPlay platform. It charges the mouse battery while providing wireless connectivity in the process, so the only tether is the one between the PC and Logitech’s charging pad.

Unsurprisingly, it does have a few rough edges. Logitech’s PowerPlay is essentially new territory for desktop-based wireless charging. We hope the second version will have faster recharge times, and a larger charging field.

Yet, even with the potential for improvement, PowerPlay seems worthwhile. It’s a wonderful novelty. You don’t need this – but it’s incredibly convenient and, finally, makes it possible to play PC games wirelessly without worrying about the battery’s charge.

Logitech G502 Lightspeed Review: Expensive Mousing Excellence

The Logitech G502 Lightspeed updates a classic gaming mouse, giving it long battery life and lighter weight, but it’s on the pricey side.

Pros

  • Great design
  • Wireless charging capability
  • Optional weight adjustment
  • Weighs less than the original

Cons

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Sometimes you can’t beat the classics. But you can reimagine them. The Logitech G502 Lightspeed takes one of the company’s most loved gaming mice and makes it lighter, faster and wireless. The 149.99 (£129.99) mouse is specced to the gills, with support for the company’s Powerplay charging mouse pad and even a bit of RGB lighting. Such features help this mouse land not only on our Best Wireless Mouse page, but also our Best Gaming Mouse page.

But Powerplay gets in the way of weight customization, and at 150, it’s expensive for a mouse.

Design and Comfort

Here’s the small miracle that Logitech pulled it off: The G502 Lightspeed, though completely redesigned internally, is a dead ringer for the old G502 Proteus Spectrum. If you cut the wire off of the old model, you’d basically have the LightSpeed. It’s impressive. Logitech’s most popular, ergonomic gaming mouse looks the same despite some serious re-engineering.

So let’s be clear. This is a right-handed gaming mouse with gaming trappings: an angular, matte black design, two RGB light zones (one of them is the Logitech G logo), plus stripes and rubberized accents that are functional, but also give the mouse an edgy look.

There’s still a rubberized, U-shaped rest for your thumb, a comfortable rounded hump and elongated buttons that feel good in both a claw and palm grip. And all of this weighs less than the old wired model at just 114 grams (4.3 ounces), despite the battery inside.

The weight, by the way, is customizable. The weight system is on the bottom and highlights some of the biggest changes to the mouse. If you prefer a heavier mouse or want to weigh the mouse more to one side or the other, you can add an additional 16g via two 4g weights and four 2g weights.

The larger weights fit in a pop-out puck (more on this puck below), and a plate around the sensor reveals room for the smaller weights, which you can put in four different compartments.

The G502 Lightspeed is also compatible with Logitech’s Powerplay wireless charging system (more on that later). If you opt to use that, you need to replace the puck that comes with the mouse with a wireless charging puck. That means that if you use wireless charging, you can’t add the 8g of weight to the back.

Some die-hards may notice that the scroll wheel, which was made entirely of metal on the original G502, is a little less beefy this time around. It has a rubberized grips and feels really light. As with the original, there’s a button to switch between smooth and clicky, notched scrolling.

Logitech G502 Lightspeed Specifications

Sensor TypeSensor ModelSensitivityPolling RatesLift-off DistanceProgrammable ButtonsLED Zones and ColorsCable Length
Optical
Hero 16K
100. 16,000 DPI
1000 Hz
Not disclosed
11
2 zones, 16.8 million colors
1.9m / 6.2 feet, detachable

Gaming Performance

With 11 programmable buttons, the G502 Lightspeed is equipped for any game. It has the basic form factor for a first-person shooter, and it worked great when I played Overwatch. It was fast and responsive, and the DPI button near where my thumb rested let me take easy, precise aim at opponents.

Those extra buttons along the side are also opportunities to customize for MMOs, to load up lots of spells.

The Hero 16K sensor, 100. 16,000 DPI sensitivity options and 1,000 Hz polling rates provide plenty of options for gamers, and makes it great for both shooters and strategy games, especially when you assign DPI adjustment to the buttons.

And while I didn’t notice any lag while using the Lightspeed, you can always connect the detachable cable if you’re worried about that kind of thing.

Features and Software

At the expense of adding some weight, the G502 Lightspeed is compatible with Logitech’s Powerplay charging mouse pad, which plugs into your PC via USB Type-A. This is primarily how I used it, so I didn’t need to worry about charging it. (For those using it without the charging mat, Logitech claims 48 hours of use with default lighting and 60 with no lighting.)

The G502 Lightspeed is compatible with Logitech’s G Hub software, where you have the ability to reprogram buttons, customize RGB and adjust DPI sensitivity. So those who want to get really fine-grained with their rodent personalization will be spending a good amount of time here.

In G Hub, you can even create different profiles and have your customizations ready for different game genres or for productivity. I had one set up to open a screenshot utility on my desktop (see how too take screenshots in Windows), for instance, though in game you’re more likely to map certain moves, skills, items, abilities or commands to a button. There’s also macro recording functionality.

Bottom Line

It’s hard to find much to dislike about the Logitech G502 Lightspeed, other than the price. The classic design is ergonomic and comfortable, the weight is adjustable and, of course, it’s wireless. It has long battery life, and if you have a Powerplay charging mat, you won’t ever have to worry about plugging it in.

But Powerplay means you can’t use some of the weights, which limits your customization options. It’s a shame both features couldn’t be fully implemented. Plus, 150 is a lot to spend on a mouse. And if you want to also opt for the wireless charging mat it supports, that tacks another 100 onto the price. Corsair’s Ironclaw RGB Wireless, for instance, is 80, and a Razer Mamba wireless is about 100.

But for all of this customization and comfort, you may gain a bit of an edge, and that may be worth the splurge. And for those who can’t quite justify the price but still like what the G502 Lightspeed brings to the gaming table, keep an eye out for sales. Logitech’s peripherals frequently go on sale with substantial discounts at both online stores and places like Best Buy in the U.S.

Logitech Powerplay review: The best argument to ditch your wired mouse

Wireless mice have a certain unsavory reputation among PC gamers. Though many will tell you that the latency associated with wireless accessories make wired ones better, that doesn’t usually come into play unless you happen to be so good at the game you’re playing that adding 10 or 20 nanoseconds to your reaction time is the difference between winning and losing. No, for most of us, the reason to stay away from wireless accessories is one of convenience: It’s decidedly not fun to have a mouse or a keyboard die on you when you’re in the middle of a game, so it’s just easier to opt for wired peripherals.

Logitech thinks it has an answer to that problem with its new Powerplay series of gaming accessories. The hope is that it can sell you on the idea of wireless mice by making sure that you never need to worry about charging them in the first place. It’s taken four years for Logitech to get the technology behind Powerplay right, and it’s safe to say that the company’s efforts weren’t wasted.

In all, Logitech sent me three products to review: two mice, the G703 and the G903, and the Powerplay mousepad, which is compatible with both. Before I dive into the review of these devices, let me quickly explain how they work.

The G703 and G903 are both wireless mice that function mostly as you would expect a wireless mouse to. They both ship with rechargeable batteries and detachable micro USB cables you can plug in whenever you’re running low on juice. Pretty straightforward so far, right?

The difference between the Powerplay series and other wireless mice actually has nothing to do with the mice at all, but rather the mousepad. That mousepad acts as a wireless charger for both the G703 and the G903, keeping them topped up as you use them. As long as you’re using the mousepad, you’ll never need to plug the mouse in, solving the biggest issue with using wireless mice for gaming.

That the Powerplay mousepad acts as a wireless charging pad is exciting enough on its own, but obviously, that’s only one part of the equation here. As cool as a wireless charging mousepad is, there’s no real reason to invest in the Powerplay system if the mice aren’t any good, after all. Let’s take an in-depth look at both of them to figure out if either is worth the cost.

Logitech G703

If we were to assign a category to the G703, we’d say that it’s the G-series mouse meant for more mainstream audiences. The mouse itself has just five buttons (if we’re not counting the clickable scroll wheel): left and right, obviously, along with a pair of buttons on the left side of the mouse, where your thumb will rest. It also has a button below the scroll wheel that you’ll use to cycle through DPI profiles. It’s not an overly complex mouse and it should be good for most any type of gamer, unless you prefer mapping hotkeys to a mouse for quick skill rotations in an MMO.

There are a lot of mice out there that scream “I’m a gaming mouse,” but with its all-black design, this isn’t one of them. It isn’t free from that certain gaming flair, necessarily, as the Logitech G and the scroll wheel do light up. All in all, though, this is a solid mouse for people who don’t need RGB lights that sync up with your keyboard or a ton of different buttons.

The buttons that are there seem to work flawlessly, in my experience. In my time with the mouse, I’ve yet to experience anything in the way of dropped inputs or shallow clicks. Speaking of clicks, the buttons on the G703 let off a very satisfying sound when you click them. It isn’t a quiet mouse, but then again, those who have had the pleasure of a truly hefty click know there’s no going back to silent mice anyway.

While the G703 might be relatively unexciting compared to its big brother, the G903, that doesn’t mean it’s a bad mouse. In fact, it’s quite the opposite: sturdy but not heavy, with a nice, inoffensive design. It feels good in the hand, and I’d even go so far as to say that it gives off a Microsoft Intellimouse design. Perhaps the only mouse in the world that people actually feel nostalgia for, the Intellimouse is fondly remembered as a no-nonsense mouse that felt good in the hand and held up to some abuse. The G703 feels very similar in that regard.

Logitech G903

If, on the other hand, you want something with more of that gaming mouse feel, the G903 is for you. It has the same all-black color scheme as the G703, though its design looks a little more sleek. For that matter, the G903 shares a lot of things with the G703: it has the same two shoulder buttons on the left side of the mouse and those lovely, loud clicks that grace each button press.

Aside from the design, there’s one major difference in the G903 when compared to the G703. In a shout out to our left-handed brothers and sisters out there, the G903 is an ambidextrous mouse. It isn’t the lazy kind of ambidextrous where the right-handed configuration is still more comfortable to use than the left-handed one, either.

No, the G903 is truly ambidextrous, offering a symmetrical design that even allows you to move the buttons on the left side of the mouse over to the right side. If you’re a left-handed gamer and you’ve been looking for a good ambidextrous mouse, Logitech has you covered with the G903.

In my experience, ambidextrous mice usually feel a little less comfortable than those which are made with a specific orientation in mind, but that isn’t the case with the G903. This is one of the most comfortable mice I’ve ever used, and I’ve had no problem using it as my daily driver since I started testing it. I will say that it is a little large in terms of length, which isn’t a problem for me since my hands are so big they might as well be baseball mitts, but for someone with smaller hands, this might prove to be a little too large.

Still, that’s really my only complaint about the G903. It’s a fantastic mouse that keeps with Logitech’s reputation for making quality PC gaming peripherals. If you can’t or don’t want to buy the Powerplay mousepad, the G903 is still worth a purchase as a standalone product. Even without its major hook (wireless charging through the mousepad), the G903 is still an excellent mouse that I think most PC gamers will enjoy using.

Logitech Powerplay Mousepad

While the G703 and the G903 make stellar gaming mice, it’s the Powerplay mousepad that’s arguably the star of the show here. After all, it’s the mousepad that makes it so you’ll never have to plug in your mouse, so without it, the G703 and G903 become a pair of excellent-but-still-battery-powered gaming mice.

As far as looks are concerned, the Powerplay mousepad is fairly standard. It comes with both soft and hard pads to lay over the wireless charging mat, allowing you to pick the feel that’s right for your set up. These pads seem to be top quality, and having tested them both, I have zero complaints (for the record, the hard pad is the one you see in all of the photos here).

The mousepad features sports a module attached to the upper left that features a light up Logitech “G” just as you see on the mice. It’s this module that plugs into a USB port on your computer, facilitating communication between your mouse and PC from there. That, importantly, means that you don’t need to use the wireless dongle that ships with your G903 or G703 as long as you’re using either mouse with the mousepad. The fact that the entire system can run using a single USB port is impressive and even sometimes necessary when you consider just how many things we’re plugging into PCs these days.

The wireless charging mat that sits beneath the mousepad itself is packed with charging coils that will keep your mouse topped up as you use it. What’s most impressive about the Powerplay mousepad is that it charges your mouse regardless of its position on the mat – a far cry from the wireless charging pads many of us are used to, which require you line up the coils in it and your phone precisely in order to begin charging.

Set up is a breeze too, requiring only four steps. All you need to do is plug your mousepad into your computer, turn in on, then insert the circular battery the pad ships with into the underside of your mouse. From there, you simply turn the mouse on and wait for it to pair with the mousepad (something that happens automatically) and you’re good to go. There’s no going into your Bluetooth settings on your PC or plugging the mouse itself in before you use it for the first time, and while that may not seem super important, it’s always nice to get up and running quickly with new equipment.

In short, the Powerplay mousepad is an excellent piece of equipment that is truly impressive in its capabilities. It feels a little strange to be raving about a mousepad of all things, but I’m struggling to come up with a negative about it. Its ability to wireless charge your mouse as you use it along with its ease of setup makes this a mousepad that’s just plain cool and a joy to use.

Wrap-Up

At first, I was a bit skeptical about the whole Powerplay system, but I have to say that I come away from this review immensely impressed by what Logitech has put together. It would have been enough for Logitech to solve the biggest problem associated with wireless mice – something the Powerplay system does very effectively – but as icing on the cake, the hardware Logitech has crafted as part of this ecosystem really is top-notch.

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

While both the G703 and G903 are excellent mice, the G903 is my personal favorite. Both mice are built around Logitech’s Lightspeed wireless technology, and the result is a pair of wireless mice that feel good in the hand, seem to have no latency problems, and are free from connectivity issues. That means a lot when I’m coming from a battery-powered wireless mouse that would sometimes lag and drop inputs, despite the fact that its wireless receiver was only ever a few feet away.

The only issue that can see here is one of price. The Powerplay mousepad costs a significant 100, while the G703 and G903 clock in at 100 and 150, respectively. That’s a lot to spend on mice and mousepads, but if you have the cash and see no downside to wireless mice aside from the fact that they need to be charged every once in a while, I’d say diving into the Powerplay ecosystem is well worth it.

You can, of course, skip the mousepad entirely and buy one of the mice as a standalone product as a way to save some money. You may need to do that for the time being, since the Powerplay mousepad is frequently sold out on Logitech’s website (and is at the time this review is being published). It seems that Logitech is onto something great here, as consumers seem to be onboard with Powerplay’s sales pitch.

Regardless of whether you’re thinking of buying a mouse on its own or buying a mouse and mousepad together, I have no problems recommending any of these products to someone who’s looking for a good wireless mouse set up. Hats off to Logitech, because it could very well get me to ditch wired mice entirely – something I would have never considered a few weeks ago.

Logitech Powerplay review: The best argument to ditch your wired mouse

Wireless mice have a certain unsavory reputation among PC gamers. Though many will tell you that the latency associated with wireless accessories make wired ones better, that doesn’t usually come into play unless you happen to be so good at the game you’re playing that adding 10 or 20 nanoseconds to your reaction time is the difference between winning and losing. No, for most of us, the reason to stay away from wireless accessories is one of convenience: It’s decidedly not fun to have a mouse or a keyboard die on you when you’re in the middle of a game, so it’s just easier to opt for wired peripherals.

Logitech thinks it has an answer to that problem with its new Powerplay series of gaming accessories. The hope is that it can sell you on the idea of wireless mice by making sure that you never need to worry about charging them in the first place. It’s taken four years for Logitech to get the technology behind Powerplay right, and it’s safe to say that the company’s efforts weren’t wasted.

In all, Logitech sent me three products to review: two mice, the G703 and the G903, and the Powerplay mousepad, which is compatible with both. Before I dive into the review of these devices, let me quickly explain how they work.

The G703 and G903 are both wireless mice that function mostly as you would expect a wireless mouse to. They both ship with rechargeable batteries and detachable micro USB cables you can plug in whenever you’re running low on juice. Pretty straightforward so far, right?

The difference between the Powerplay series and other wireless mice actually has nothing to do with the mice at all, but rather the mousepad. That mousepad acts as a wireless charger for both the G703 and the G903, keeping them topped up as you use them. As long as you’re using the mousepad, you’ll never need to plug the mouse in, solving the biggest issue with using wireless mice for gaming.

That the Powerplay mousepad acts as a wireless charging pad is exciting enough on its own, but obviously, that’s only one part of the equation here. As cool as a wireless charging mousepad is, there’s no real reason to invest in the Powerplay system if the mice aren’t any good, after all. Let’s take an in-depth look at both of them to figure out if either is worth the cost.

Logitech G703

If we were to assign a category to the G703, we’d say that it’s the G-series mouse meant for more mainstream audiences. The mouse itself has just five buttons (if we’re not counting the clickable scroll wheel): left and right, obviously, along with a pair of buttons on the left side of the mouse, where your thumb will rest. It also has a button below the scroll wheel that you’ll use to cycle through DPI profiles. It’s not an overly complex mouse and it should be good for most any type of gamer, unless you prefer mapping hotkeys to a mouse for quick skill rotations in an MMO.

There are a lot of mice out there that scream “I’m a gaming mouse,” but with its all-black design, this isn’t one of them. It isn’t free from that certain gaming flair, necessarily, as the Logitech G and the scroll wheel do light up. All in all, though, this is a solid mouse for people who don’t need RGB lights that sync up with your keyboard or a ton of different buttons.

The buttons that are there seem to work flawlessly, in my experience. In my time with the mouse, I’ve yet to experience anything in the way of dropped inputs or shallow clicks. Speaking of clicks, the buttons on the G703 let off a very satisfying sound when you click them. It isn’t a quiet mouse, but then again, those who have had the pleasure of a truly hefty click know there’s no going back to silent mice anyway.

While the G703 might be relatively unexciting compared to its big brother, the G903, that doesn’t mean it’s a bad mouse. In fact, it’s quite the opposite: sturdy but not heavy, with a nice, inoffensive design. It feels good in the hand, and I’d even go so far as to say that it gives off a Microsoft Intellimouse design. Perhaps the only mouse in the world that people actually feel nostalgia for, the Intellimouse is fondly remembered as a no-nonsense mouse that felt good in the hand and held up to some abuse. The G703 feels very similar in that regard.

Logitech G903

If, on the other hand, you want something with more of that gaming mouse feel, the G903 is for you. It has the same all-black color scheme as the G703, though its design looks a little more sleek. For that matter, the G903 shares a lot of things with the G703: it has the same two shoulder buttons on the left side of the mouse and those lovely, loud clicks that grace each button press.

Aside from the design, there’s one major difference in the G903 when compared to the G703. In a shout out to our left-handed brothers and sisters out there, the G903 is an ambidextrous mouse. It isn’t the lazy kind of ambidextrous where the right-handed configuration is still more comfortable to use than the left-handed one, either.

No, the G903 is truly ambidextrous, offering a symmetrical design that even allows you to move the buttons on the left side of the mouse over to the right side. If you’re a left-handed gamer and you’ve been looking for a good ambidextrous mouse, Logitech has you covered with the G903.

In my experience, ambidextrous mice usually feel a little less comfortable than those which are made with a specific orientation in mind, but that isn’t the case with the G903. This is one of the most comfortable mice I’ve ever used, and I’ve had no problem using it as my daily driver since I started testing it. I will say that it is a little large in terms of length, which isn’t a problem for me since my hands are so big they might as well be baseball mitts, but for someone with smaller hands, this might prove to be a little too large.

Still, that’s really my only complaint about the G903. It’s a fantastic mouse that keeps with Logitech‘s reputation for making quality PC gaming peripherals. If you can’t or don’t want to buy the Powerplay mousepad, the G903 is still worth a purchase as a standalone product. Even without its major hook (wireless charging through the mousepad), the G903 is still an excellent mouse that I think most PC gamers will enjoy using.

Logitech Powerplay Mousepad

While the G703 and the G903 make stellar gaming mice, it’s the Powerplay mousepad that’s arguably the star of the show here. After all, it’s the mousepad that makes it so you’ll never have to plug in your mouse, so without it, the G703 and G903 become a pair of excellent-but-still-battery-powered gaming mice.

As far as looks are concerned, the Powerplay mousepad is fairly standard. It comes with both soft and hard pads to lay over the wireless charging mat, allowing you to pick the feel that’s right for your set up. These pads seem to be top quality, and having tested them both, I have zero complaints (for the record, the hard pad is the one you see in all of the photos here).

The mousepad features sports a module attached to the upper left that features a light up Logitech “G” just as you see on the mice. It’s this module that plugs into a USB port on your computer, facilitating communication between your mouse and PC from there. That, importantly, means that you don’t need to use the wireless dongle that ships with your G903 or G703 as long as you’re using either mouse with the mousepad. The fact that the entire system can run using a single USB port is impressive and even sometimes necessary when you consider just how many things we’re plugging into PCs these days.

The wireless charging mat that sits beneath the mousepad itself is packed with charging coils that will keep your mouse topped up as you use it. What’s most impressive about the Powerplay mousepad is that it charges your mouse regardless of its position on the mat – a far cry from the wireless charging pads many of us are used to, which require you line up the coils in it and your phone precisely in order to begin charging.

Set up is a breeze too, requiring only four steps. All you need to do is plug your mousepad into your computer, turn in on, then insert the circular battery the pad ships with into the underside of your mouse. From there, you simply turn the mouse on and wait for it to pair with the mousepad (something that happens automatically) and you’re good to go. There’s no going into your Bluetooth settings on your PC or plugging the mouse itself in before you use it for the first time, and while that may not seem super important, it’s always nice to get up and running quickly with new equipment.

In short, the Powerplay mousepad is an excellent piece of equipment that is truly impressive in its capabilities. It feels a little strange to be raving about a mousepad of all things, but I’m struggling to come up with a negative about it. Its ability to wireless charge your mouse as you use it along with its ease of setup makes this a mousepad that’s just plain cool and a joy to use.

Wrap-Up

At first, I was a bit skeptical about the whole Powerplay system, but I have to say that I come away from this review immensely impressed by what Logitech has put together. It would have been enough for Logitech to solve the biggest problem associated with wireless mice – something the Powerplay system does very effectively – but as icing on the cake, the hardware Logitech has crafted as part of this ecosystem really is top-notch.

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

logitech, g502, lightspeed, review

While both the G703 and G903 are excellent mice, the G903 is my personal favorite. Both mice are built around Logitech‘s Lightspeed wireless technology, and the result is a pair of wireless mice that feel good in the hand, seem to have no latency problems, and are free from connectivity issues. That means a lot when I’m coming from a battery-powered wireless mouse that would sometimes lag and drop inputs, despite the fact that its wireless receiver was only ever a few feet away.

The only issue that can see here is one of price. The Powerplay mousepad costs a significant 100, while the G703 and G903 clock in at 100 and 150, respectively. That’s a lot to spend on mice and mousepads, but if you have the cash and see no downside to wireless mice aside from the fact that they need to be charged every once in a while, I’d say diving into the Powerplay ecosystem is well worth it.

You can, of course, skip the mousepad entirely and buy one of the mice as a standalone product as a way to save some money. You may need to do that for the time being, since the Powerplay mousepad is frequently sold out on Logitech‘s website (and is at the time this review is being published). It seems that Logitech is onto something great here, as consumers seem to be onboard with Powerplay’s sales pitch.

Regardless of whether you’re thinking of buying a mouse on its own or buying a mouse and mousepad together, I have no problems recommending any of these products to someone who’s looking for a good wireless mouse set up. Hats off to Logitech, because it could very well get me to ditch wired mice entirely – something I would have never considered a few weeks ago.

Author

Kerariel

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