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Bose SoundLink Revolve review: Mini Bluetooth speaker, maximum sound. Bose…

Bose SoundLink Revolve review: Mini Bluetooth speaker, maximum sound

The smaller of Bose’s new 360-degree “omnidirectional” Bluetooth speakers doesn’t have a handle but it’s still a great little speaker.

Executive Editor David Carnoy has been a leading member of CNET’s Reviews team since 2000. He covers the gamut of gadgets and is a notable reviewer of mobile accessories and portable audio products, including headphones and speakers. He’s also an e-reader and e-publishing expert as well as the author of the novels Knife Music, The Big Exit and Lucidity. All the titles are available as Kindle, iBooks, Nook e-books and audiobooks.

Cylindrical design, 360-degree omnidirectional sound.

bose, soundlink, revolve, review, mini, bluetooth

Bose SoundLink Revolve

The Good

The sleek Bose SoundLink Revolve Bluetooth speaker sounds excellent for its compact size. Battery life is good at 12 hours, there’s a threaded tripod mount on the bottom of the speaker and an integrated microphone for speakerphone calls.

The Bad

Expensive, and the cradle that makes charging easier is an optional 30 accessory. The pricier Revolve Plus sounds even better.

The Bottom Line

While I’d lean toward the bigger Revolve Plus, Bose’s SoundLink Revolve is still of the best-sounding Bluetooth speakers for its size.

If you’ve been monitoring the Bluetooth speaker space, you’re probably aware that such descriptors are nothing new. Ultimate Ears led the 360-degree charge with its Boom. Boom 2 and Megaboom. and JBL’s popular cylindrical Flip and Charge series speakers are on their fourth generation. They all promise full-range sound without having to worry about placement.

Bose’s two versions of the tubular, portable, battery-powered Bluetooth speaker are the SoundLink Revolve (199, £199.95, AU299) reviewed here and its bigger brother, the Revolve Plus (299, £279.95 or AU439). They’re expensive, but their design is excellent and they both sound great for small speakers. Between the two, I like the Plus best thanks to superior bass and an ability to play louder. The smaller Revolve is no slouch though, and is one of the best sounding speakers for its size.

Like its larger sibling, the Revolve features a “seamless” aluminum enclosure, but it leaves off the handle found in the Revolve Plus. It reminded me a little of the Google Home speaker without its top shaved off at an angle. The Google Home however feels cheap in comparison to the Bose: It weighs less, doesn’t have an integrated battery and must be plugged into a power source. The Revolve also sounds better.

While the Revolve seems at first glance more like an indoor speaker, it’s both water- as well as shock-resistant and is designed with outdoor use in mind. It’s also worth mentioning that it has a threaded tripod mount on the bottom of the speaker that allows you to attach it to a wall mount or a stand. And Bose sells a charging cradle for 30 (£25, AU40), which makes charging easier than using the included USB cable (it’s a shame the charging cradle isn’t included like it is with the SoundLink Mini II. which has now dropped from 200 to 180 in the US while costing £170 in the UK and AU249 in Australia).

Raising the sound bar for tiny speakers

As I stated previously, there are a lot of cylindrical shaped speakers out there, and the Revolve’s biggest competitors include the UE Boom 2, UE Wonderboom. JBL Flip 4 and JBL Charge 3 (a Charge 4 is on the way). JBL also has the Pulse 2. which puts on a light show.

Most of these speakers cost less than the Revolve.- and the UE Wonderboom and Flip 4 cost half as much. Is the Revolve twice as good as those speakers?

The short answer is no, but it does offer superior sound. It not only plays louder but its bass response is better and it sounds a little more natural with a little better detail. It also beats the higher priced UE Boom 2 and BO Play’s hamburger-sized Beoplay A1. which costs 250 (£199, AU379) and sounds very good for its size.

However, both those speakers do offer better battery life. The SoundLink Revolve is rated to play for 12 hours at moderate volume levels while the Beoplay A1 is rated for 24 hours and UE Boom 2 is rated for 15 hours. The Boom 2 is also fully waterproof and is very well suited to outdoor use (I still think the UE Boom 2’s an excellent speaker, the Revolve just sounds a little better).

Not surprisingly the larger Revolve Plus plays louder and outputs more bass than the Revolve. But the Revolve is still able to come out on top of the SoundLink Mini II and approaches if not slightly exceeds the sound of the SoundLink Bluetooth Speaker III.

Both Revolve speakers play much bigger than their size would indicate, and although they do have their sound limitations, they can fill a small to medium room with sound. They’d work well in a dorm room, home office or bedroom.

While you’d think that 360-degree sound would mean they’re best placed in the middle of a room, it actually helps to place these speakers near a wall to get some reflection, which improves the bass.

The Revolve sounded the same whether plugged in or running via battery, although Bose says output is limited slightly to conserve power when the battery dips below 30 percent. It was hard for me to tell the difference, but some people might.

The Revolve has an integrated microphone so it can be used as speakerphone, a feature that worked well in my tests. There’s NFC tap-to-pair technology for devices that support it, and more importantly you can wirelessly pair two of these speakers (or other recent Bose Bluetooth speakers starting with the SoundLink Color II) using the Bose Connect app, configuring them as a set of stereo speakers or doubling them up to augment the sound. (You can also upgrade the speaker’s firmware via the app which is important to do because Bose is already updating the speaker’s software to quash any bugs and hopefully improve the overall performance).

To test stereo pairing I threw on some tracks from the ’60s and ’70s (The Rolling Stones, The Doors and The Beatles) that feature a lot of stereo separation. They sounded good for compact, battery-powered wireless speakers, but don’t expect a pair of Revolves to beat a decent set of wireless powered speakers such as Bose’s own SoundTouch 10 or Sonos Play:1 speakers, both of which can be set up as a stereo pair.

Louder, meet smaller

I’ll repeat what I said about the Revolve Plus. When I say this Bose sounds excellent, what I really means is that it sounds excellent compared to other very compact Bluetooth speakers. The fact is you could hit a patch where you say to yourself that sounds a little rough.- or a little weird. The Revolve is only capable of so much, and can’t quite escape the boundaries inherent in streaming audio over Bluetooth to a small speaker.

What separates the Bose from its competitors is the ability play a little louder, put out more bass without distorting and sound a little more natural with decent detail. For example, UE’s Wonderboom, which retails for a third of the price and is an excellent mini Bluetooth speaker, stumbled over parts of the bass line in the Shaun Frank remix of The Chainsmokers’ “Closer.” The Revolve managed to get through those sections without breaking up. It didn’t sound great when I hit with deep bass or complicated music, but it sounded better than most small speakers.

Audiophiles will find fault with the Revolve’s sound, particularly compared to wired 200 speakers. But the vast majority of people will think it’s a great sounding little speaker that can be easily moved from room to room or carried outside, where it can fill a patio area with sound.- maybe not at dance party-level, but certainly at background music volumes.

As I said, I personally find myself leaning towards spending the extra dough on the SoundLink Revolve Plus, but if you don’t need that extra bit of fullness and volume, you’ll be quite happy saving some money with the Revolve.

  • Dimensions: 6 inches high, 3.25 inches deep, 1.5 lbs.
  • IPX4 water-resistant
  • Shock resistant
  • Threaded tripod mount on bottom of speaker
  • Battery life: 12 hours
  • NFC tap-to-pair technology (with devices that support NFC)
  • Bose Connect app connects two SoundLink speakers starting with Bose SoundLink Color II (stereo pairing or double-up party mode).
  • Integrated microphone to use as speakerphone or with Siri and Google Assistant
  • Colors: triple black, gray lux
  • Price: 199, £199.95, AU299

Bose’s petite Bluetooth speaker makes a huge impact Tested at £200 / 200

What Hi-Fi? Verdict

Huge performance from a tiny speaker; this talented Bose speaker could be worth a place in your home

Pros

  • Great omnidirectional delivery
  • Big, solid, punchy sound
  • Portable and feature-packed

Cons

Why you can trust What Hi-Fi?

Our expert team reviews products in dedicated test rooms, to help you make the best choice for your budget. Find out more about how we test.

There’s no shortage of portable Bluetooth speakers on the market, but the £200 Bose SoundLink Revolve ticks all the right boxes – and then some – to stand out from the rest.

The speaker’s cylindrical design is key to delivering its 360-degree sound.

Build

Inside the sturdy aluminium casing, there’s a full-range driver firing downwards into a patented diffuser plate, which aims to spread the sound out evenly in all directions.

There are also two passive radiators inside, responsible for reinforcing the lower frequencies. They’re placed opposite each other to cancel out any vibrations.

The Bose Revolve is a strikingly petite speaker, and we can see it fitting into just about any space in your home. The speaker has a decent heft – it feels more substantial than the similar-sized Google Home, for instance – but it can still be held in the palm of your hand.

Designed to be portable, the Revolve is compact enough to be carried in a backpack. You get 12 hours of battery life – that’s a good chunk of listening, though it’s worth noting that rivals such as the UE Roll, Boom 2 or Megaboom give you 15 and 20 hours respectively.

We’re not sure you’d want to lug it to a festival, as it’s water-resistant – not waterproof – and not wholly designed for rugged, muddy terrain like many of its rivals. Its IPX4 rating means it will survive splashes of water, though.

The Revolve’s rubber top can get a bit grubby, more so the ‘lux grey’ (silver) finish rather than the ‘triple black’ (black) version. And while it’s designed to withstand knocks and drops, our sample already has some scratches on the finish.

Features

The Revolve is a straightforward Bluetooth speaker – pairing is swift, and it automatically connects to your smartphone the next time you fire it up. There’s also a 3.5mm input if you want to hardwire other music sources.

The six buttons on the rubber top of the speaker let you switch between these two inputs (an LED lights up to indicate connection), adjust volume and turn the power on and off. Press down the power button, and a voice will tell you how much battery charge is left.

Bluetooth Yes

Inputs 3.5mm

Battery life 12 hours

Dimensions (hwd) 15 x 8 x 8cm

Weight 0.66kg

A neat touch from Bose is that you can pause, play and skip through your music using the multifunction button (the one with the three dots). You can also use that button to speak to your smartphone’s voice assistant – even if your phone is in another room.

The buttons are responsive, although it’s more likely you’ll be using your smartphone or tablet to control and select the music anyway.

The free Bose Connect app is worth downloading for updates, as well as checking the speaker’s battery level and enabling Party Mode – which lets you connect two Revolve speakers to play in tandem or as a stereo pair.

Sound

For such a small speaker, the Bose Revolve delivers a surprisingly big and bold sound. It has no problem filling up our medium-sized test room – even at two-thirds of its full volume.

It does its key job – spreading sound around evenly – with aplomb. Even as we move around the speaker, there is little variance in the presentation. The music remains solid and robust regardless of our position.

That solidity is what makes the Revolve so listenable. We play Linkin Park’s One Step Closer and the drums hit with a satisfying thump, basslines are deep and full bodied, and the rhythm is punchy and gripping.

Small Bluetooth speakers have a tendency to exaggerate the lower frequencies in a bid to impress – Bose has been guilty of that in the past – but the Revolve strikes an enjoyable balance.

There’s a warmth to the sound that makes it enjoyable to listen to, and this time, Bose steers clear of making the bass go too boomy.

It delivers plenty of detail alongside the punch. The guitar strums in Death Cab for Cutie’s A Lack of Colour sound delicate and precise, while voices are gentle and melodic.

It’s not perfect – we wish the Bose sounded clearer, and that edges of notes were more definite and crisply defined. Its rival, the UE Megaboom, is more articulate and handles dynamic shifts and rhythm changes with more confidence. The Megaboom delivers a bigger scale of sound, too, but then it is physically bigger.

The Megaboom breathes in more openness into the performance, and you can identify instruments’ placement better, too. The Bose Revolve is less insightful, but it’s still fun to listen to. Its sense of energy and drive is apparent with whatever you song you play through it, and when it goes loud, it’s capable of impressive volume.

Verdict

Compared with its main rivals, such as the UE Megaboom, the Revolve is a bit too pricey. £200 is quite a lot to pay for a speaker, especially when the Megaboom is bigger, clearer, more ruggedly-built and available for less.

However, it’s hard not to admire the Bose Revolve for its range of talents, though, and despite not getting the full five stars, we can imagine this tiny, talented speaker will still turn plenty of heads.

Bose SoundLink Revolve review

The Bose SoundLink Revolve is an excellent choice for those looking for a true 360-degree listening experience. Yes, it’s expensive, but it also sounds great. The biggest issue is that the Revolve lacks dust and waterproofing, which means it’s not a speaker you want to take with you to the beach.

Pros

  • True 360-degree sound
  • Beautiful design and build
  • Detailed and expansive sound

Cons

  • – Only 30ft (10m) range
  • – Charging dock not included
  • – Not fully water or dustproof

Why you can trust TechRadar

We spend hours testing every product or service we review, so you can be sure you’re buying the best. Find out more about how we test.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve aims to solve the main problem with most wireless speakers: despite their convenience, they’re usually directional, sounding their best in one specific spot. Bose (and others) have attempted to fix this with 360-degree sound technology.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve continues the company’s history of excellent build quality and sound and crams it all into a cylindrical speaker you can take with you on the go. The speaker bears a striking resemblance to the company’s excellent Bose SoundLink Mini II speaker, but in a different form factor.

And while the Revolve is starting to show its age – this review was originally penned when it launched in 2017 – it remains a capable little unit. If you need more heft and extra battery power, we’d direct you towards the Bose SoundLink Revolve.

One negative point we’ll mention straight away is that the IPX4 rating on the SoundLink Revolve means the speaker will survive splashes but probably not a dip in the pool or a trip to the beach.

That’s a big drawback, especially for an original price point of 199 (£199, AU299); but, if it’s any consolation, the speaker at least sounds better than much of the fully waterproof competition. There are some Bose promo codes around to help reduce the price further too.

The successors to the Soundlink Revolve and Revolve portable speakers, the new models are nearly identical to the brand’s popular speakers, albeit with a few important upgrades.

The new Revolve II now comes with a 13-hour battery life, a modest upgrade from its predecessor’s 12-hour charge. Meanwhile, the battery life of the Revolve II has been increased from 16 to 17 hours.

Both Bluetooth speakers have been given an IP55 rating, increasing their water-resistance, and adding protection from dust.]

Bose SoundLink Revolve: design

The Revolve takes the design of its predecessor the SoundLink Mini II and stretches it into a cylindrical shape that slightly resembles the Dalek robots from Dr. Who.

It features a strong aluminum housing which comes in either silver or black and features a rubberized base and buttons. The Bose SoundLink Revolve feels extremely well made, and should put up with being tossed in a bag with keys and knick knacks (for example).

On top of the Revolve speaker you’ll find buttons for controlling every feature of the unit, including volume, playback, Bluetooth 4.0, aux and power. Bose’s multifunction button controls everything from music playback to activating voice assistants like Siri and Google Assistant. The SoundLink revolve works great as a speakerphone for taking calls – something lacking on one of this speaker’s well-regarded contemporaries, the UE Wonderboom.

The microphone on the Bose SoundLink Revolve is located on top of the speaker, so it’s able to hear your voice from any direction.

On the bottom of the speaker you’ll find four pins for an optional charging dock and a threaded tripod mount. It’s disappointing that Bose didn’t throw in the 30 (£19.95) charging dock for free like it does with the slightly cheaper SoundLink Mini II, which costs 180 (£170, AU300). While it might seem odd to have a tripod mount, it offers more flexibility for getting the Revolve perfectly positioned in your home.

Bose also lets you pair two Revolve speakers to use for stereo or amplification, a neat feature that’s becoming more and more common these days. This will work up to a range of 10m.

Pairing for this feature can be done on the device itself, but it’s more convenient to use the Bose app. You have the option of using the speakers in stereo or mono, depending if they’re in the same room or not.

On the inside the Revolve features a dual passive radiator setup running up the sides of the speaker to fill out the lower end of the audio spectrum. Mids and trebles are handled by a downward facing transducer, which uses a deflector plate to distribute sound equally in all directions.

Bose claims that this driver configuration allows the speaker to create a full 360-degrees of sound around the speaker, and without any audio blindspots.

Bose SoundLink Revolve: performance

The biggest reason go to with the Bose SoundLink Revolve over one of its flat-faced rivals is if you want omni-directional sound. With it, you can move around and experience the same sound wherever you are. This is great for parties, for example, so everyone can have the same listening experience no matter where they’re sitting.

In terms of volume, the SoundLink Revolve does a great job of pumping music loudly in all directions. That said, if you place it at the center of the room, the speaker lacks some bass response – though that can be remedied by placing the speaker near walls to help reflect sound and increase the bass response.

Overall, the Bose SoundLink Revolve’s sonic performance is excellent, especially when compared to one of our other favorite 360-degree speakers, the UE Wonderboom. Where the Wonderboom sounds strained, the Bose plays loudly and effortlessly.

Bass response also sounds richer and more controlled than the Wonderboom, which features a mid-forward sound. However, you should take into account that the Wonderboom is half the price of Revolve.

Compared to the aging SoundLink Mini II, the SoundLink Revolve sounds almost as good but can’t match the expansive soundstage and instrumental separation of the Mini II – though, admittedly both speakers sound very good and you’ll be hard pressed to notice the difference unless you listen to them side by side.

Compared to the Bose SoundLink Color II, the Revolve features more detail and bass response. The 360-degree sound makes the Revolve more suited to listening outdoors than the directional sound of the SoundLink Color II. Both the Color II and Revolve are IPX4 rated, which means they’ll survive splashes but you won’t want to dunk either speaker in the pool.

Compared to the competition, the Revolve’s battery life is average for a speaker of this size, lasting 12 hours at moderate listening volumes (the Revolve improves on this marginally, with a 16-hour battery life). Be careful about charging the speaker the night before a big event as it also takes the speaker a ridiculously long 4 hours to fully charge when empty. It would have been nice to see Bose jump to USB-C for faster charging, but it’s not a deal breaker.

Final verdict

The Bose SoundLink Revolve is an excellent sound speaker for users looking for true 360-degree sound. It’s great for sharing music during a party or for moving around the room without losing audio fidelity. However, the Bose SoundLink Mini II sounds slightly better and is slightly cheaper to boot.

On the debit side, it’s also not fully dust or waterproof so you’ll want to think twice before bringing the Revolve to the beach.

For half the price, the Wonderboom is a great speaker that is completely dust and waterproof. While it can’t match the audio fidelity or features of the Bose, it’s still great for on-the-go listening. If bass is your game, the JBL Charge 3 is an excellent fully waterproof speaker that sounds great, but is big and heavy along with it.

Bose SoundLink Revolve review

The Bose SoundLink Revolve is an excellent choice for those looking for a true 360-degree listening experience. Yes, it’s expensive, but it also sounds great. The biggest issue is that the Revolve lacks dust and waterproofing, which means it’s not a speaker you want to take with you to the beach.

Pros

  • True 360-degree sound
  • Beautiful design and build
  • Detailed and expansive sound

Cons

  • – Only 30ft (10m) range
  • – Charging dock not included
  • – Not fully water or dustproof

Why you can trust TechRadar

We spend hours testing every product or service we review, so you can be sure you’re buying the best. Find out more about how we test.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve aims to solve the main problem with most wireless speakers: despite their convenience, they’re usually directional, sounding their best in one specific spot. Bose (and others) have attempted to fix this with 360-degree sound technology.

The Bose SoundLink Revolve continues the company’s history of excellent build quality and sound and crams it all into a cylindrical speaker you can take with you on the go. The speaker bears a striking resemblance to the company’s excellent Bose SoundLink Mini II speaker, but in a different form factor.

And while the Revolve is starting to show its age – this review was originally penned when it launched in 2017 – it remains a capable little unit. If you need more heft and extra battery power, we’d direct you towards the Bose SoundLink Revolve.

One negative point we’ll mention straight away is that the IPX4 rating on the SoundLink Revolve means the speaker will survive splashes but probably not a dip in the pool or a trip to the beach.

That’s a big drawback, especially for an original price point of 199 (£199, AU299); but, if it’s any consolation, the speaker at least sounds better than much of the fully waterproof competition. There are some Bose promo codes around to help reduce the price further too.

The successors to the Soundlink Revolve and Revolve portable speakers, the new models are nearly identical to the brand’s popular speakers, albeit with a few important upgrades.

The new Revolve II now comes with a 13-hour battery life, a modest upgrade from its predecessor’s 12-hour charge. Meanwhile, the battery life of the Revolve II has been increased from 16 to 17 hours.

Both Bluetooth speakers have been given an IP55 rating, increasing their water-resistance, and adding protection from dust.]

Bose SoundLink Revolve: design

The Revolve takes the design of its predecessor the SoundLink Mini II and stretches it into a cylindrical shape that slightly resembles the Dalek robots from Dr. Who.

It features a strong aluminum housing which comes in either silver or black and features a rubberized base and buttons. The Bose SoundLink Revolve feels extremely well made, and should put up with being tossed in a bag with keys and knick knacks (for example).

On top of the Revolve speaker you’ll find buttons for controlling every feature of the unit, including volume, playback, Bluetooth 4.0, aux and power. Bose’s multifunction button controls everything from music playback to activating voice assistants like Siri and Google Assistant. The SoundLink revolve works great as a speakerphone for taking calls – something lacking on one of this speaker’s well-regarded contemporaries, the UE Wonderboom.

The microphone on the Bose SoundLink Revolve is located on top of the speaker, so it’s able to hear your voice from any direction.

On the bottom of the speaker you’ll find four pins for an optional charging dock and a threaded tripod mount. It’s disappointing that Bose didn’t throw in the 30 (£19.95) charging dock for free like it does with the slightly cheaper SoundLink Mini II, which costs 180 (£170, AU300). While it might seem odd to have a tripod mount, it offers more flexibility for getting the Revolve perfectly positioned in your home.

Bose also lets you pair two Revolve speakers to use for stereo or amplification, a neat feature that’s becoming more and more common these days. This will work up to a range of 10m.

Pairing for this feature can be done on the device itself, but it’s more convenient to use the Bose app. You have the option of using the speakers in stereo or mono, depending if they’re in the same room or not.

On the inside the Revolve features a dual passive radiator setup running up the sides of the speaker to fill out the lower end of the audio spectrum. Mids and trebles are handled by a downward facing transducer, which uses a deflector plate to distribute sound equally in all directions.

Bose claims that this driver configuration allows the speaker to create a full 360-degrees of sound around the speaker, and without any audio blindspots.

Bose SoundLink Revolve: performance

The biggest reason go to with the Bose SoundLink Revolve over one of its flat-faced rivals is if you want omni-directional sound. With it, you can move around and experience the same sound wherever you are. This is great for parties, for example, so everyone can have the same listening experience no matter where they’re sitting.

In terms of volume, the SoundLink Revolve does a great job of pumping music loudly in all directions. That said, if you place it at the center of the room, the speaker lacks some bass response – though that can be remedied by placing the speaker near walls to help reflect sound and increase the bass response.

Overall, the Bose SoundLink Revolve’s sonic performance is excellent, especially when compared to one of our other favorite 360-degree speakers, the UE Wonderboom. Where the Wonderboom sounds strained, the Bose plays loudly and effortlessly.

Bass response also sounds richer and more controlled than the Wonderboom, which features a mid-forward sound. However, you should take into account that the Wonderboom is half the price of Revolve.

Compared to the aging SoundLink Mini II, the SoundLink Revolve sounds almost as good but can’t match the expansive soundstage and instrumental separation of the Mini II – though, admittedly both speakers sound very good and you’ll be hard pressed to notice the difference unless you listen to them side by side.

Compared to the Bose SoundLink Color II, the Revolve features more detail and bass response. The 360-degree sound makes the Revolve more suited to listening outdoors than the directional sound of the SoundLink Color II. Both the Color II and Revolve are IPX4 rated, which means they’ll survive splashes but you won’t want to dunk either speaker in the pool.

Compared to the competition, the Revolve‘s battery life is average for a speaker of this size, lasting 12 hours at moderate listening volumes (the Revolve improves on this marginally, with a 16-hour battery life). Be careful about charging the speaker the night before a big event as it also takes the speaker a ridiculously long 4 hours to fully charge when empty. It would have been nice to see Bose jump to USB-C for faster charging, but it’s not a deal breaker.

Final verdict

The Bose SoundLink Revolve is an excellent sound speaker for users looking for true 360-degree sound. It’s great for sharing music during a party or for moving around the room without losing audio fidelity. However, the Bose SoundLink Mini II sounds slightly better and is slightly cheaper to boot.

On the debit side, it’s also not fully dust or waterproof so you’ll want to think twice before bringing the Revolve to the beach.

For half the price, the Wonderboom is a great speaker that is completely dust and waterproof. While it can’t match the audio fidelity or features of the Bose, it’s still great for on-the-go listening. If bass is your game, the JBL Charge 3 is an excellent fully waterproof speaker that sounds great, but is big and heavy along with it.

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